beam engine


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beam engine

n
(Mechanical Engineering) an early type of steam engine, in which a pivoted beam is vibrated by a vertical steam cylinder at one end, so that it transmits motion to the workload, such as a pump, at the other end
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William Bradley, Howard's father, who was born in 1912, worked at the pumping station as a filter house attendant and beam engine driver between 1946 and 1975.
A Newcomen-type beam engine still in use in the late 19th century
The chief attraction is the 1840 steam- powered beam engine used to pump water out of the mine.
The proposal to hide the historic James Watt beam engine on Dartmouth Circus behind a large advertising screen was particularly unpopular with the planners.
He took me as a child to Ironbridge and explained about the bridge and he also took me to see a beam engine working.
There will be visuals from a VJ (video jockey) called Beam Engine.
Other toys include five modern wooden rocking horses making an impressive display and estimated at between pounds 100 and pounds 400 each, two scarce Elastolin 70mm scale figures of Goering and Goebbels (pounds 100/150) and, not really toys but finely engineered models include a Victorian beam engine (pounds 400/600) and four guns or cannons (pounds 100/350 each).
Their line includes an old-fashioned "walking beam engine," as well as a totally enclosed single-acting or compound twin, and a single-acting V-4 that can deliver up to 40 hp.
At the heart of the LBP-860 is Canon's most advanced, 600 dpi, 8-page per minute laser beam engine, the LBP-EX.
Signature Outdoor are able to advertise on Dartmouth Circus, where the historic Boulton & Watt beam engine is sited.
Most contentious was the proposal to place billboards, including a fullmotion digital screen, around Dartmouth Circus, blocking views of historic beam engine designed by James Watt, a proud tribute to the city's industrial past.
The original steam beam engine which powered the Stephenson works has been transferred to Beamish Museum in County Durham, along with a lathe believed to have been used by George Stephenson when he worked at Killingworth Colliery.