bearing

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bear·ing

 (bâr′ĭng)
n.
1. The manner in which one carries or conducts oneself: the poise and bearing of a champion. See Synonyms at behavior.
2.
a. A machine or structural part that supports another part.
b. A device that supports, guides, and reduces the friction of motion between fixed and moving machine parts.
3. Something that supports weight.
4. The part of an arch or beam that rests on a support.
5.
a. The act, power, or period of producing fruit or offspring.
b. The quantity produced; yield.
6. Direction, especially angular direction measured from one position to another using geographical or celestial reference lines.
7. often bearings Awareness of one's position or situation relative to one's surroundings: lost my bearings after taking the wrong exit.
8. Relevant relationship or interconnection: Those issues have no bearing on our situation.
9. Heraldry A charge or device on a field.
adj.
Architecture Designed to support structural weight: a bearing wall.

bearing

(ˈbɛərɪŋ)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a support, guide, or locating piece for a rotating or reciprocating mechanical part
2. (foll by: on or upon) relevance (to): it has no bearing on this problem.
3. a person's general social conduct, esp in manners, dress, and behaviour
4.
a. the act, period, or capability of producing fruit or young
b. an amount produced; yield
5. (Building) the part of a beam or lintel that rests on a support
6. anything that carries weight or acts as a support
7. (Navigation) the angular direction of a line, point, or course measured from true north or south (true bearing), magnetic north or south (magnetic bearing), or one's own position
8. (Navigation) (usually plural) the position or direction, as of a ship, fixed with reference to two or more known points
9. (usually plural) a sense of one's relative position or situation; orientation (esp in the phrases lose, get, or take one's bearings)
10. (Heraldry) heraldry
a. a device or emblem on a heraldic shield; charge
b. another name for coat of arms

bear•ing

(ˈbɛər ɪŋ)

n.
1. the manner in which one conducts or carries oneself, including posture and gestures: a person of dignified bearing.
2. the act, capability, or period of producing or bringing forth.
3. something that is produced; a crop.
4. the act of enduring or the capacity to endure.
5. reference or relation (usu. fol. by on): It has no bearing on the problem.
6.
a. a supporting part of a structure.
b. the area of contact between a bearing member, as a beam, and a pier, wall, or other underlying support.
7. the support and guide for a rotating, oscillating, or sliding shaft, pivot, or wheel.
8. Often, bearings. direction: The pilot radioed the plane's bearings.
9. a horizontal direction expressed in degrees east or west of a true or magnetic north or south direction.
10. a device on a heraldic field.
[1200–50]

bearing

The horizontal angle at a given point measured clockwise from a specific datum point to a second point. See also grid bearing; relative bearing; true bearing.

Bearing

 

See Also: FACIAL EXPRESSIONS, MISCELLANEOUS; LYING; PERSONALITY PROFILES; PHYSICAL APPEARANCE; POSTURE; SITTING; STANDING; WALKING

  1. Carried it [a bright, haggard look] … like a mask or a flag —William Faulkner
  2. Exuded an air, almost an aroma, of justification, like a mother who has lived to see her maligned boy vindicated at last —Harvey Swados
  3. Sitting up against the pillow, head back like a boxer between rounds —John Le Carré
  4. Head lifted as though she carried life as lightly there as if it were a hat made of tulle —Paule Marshall

    See Also: HEAD MOVEMENTS

  5. Held her body with a kind of awkward pride mixed with shame, like a young girl suddenly conscious of her flesh —Ross Macdonald
  6. Held herself like a daughter of the Caesars —W. Somerset Maugham
  7. Held his shoulders like a man conscious of responsibility —Willa Cather
  8. He leaned back and crossed his legs, as if we were settling in front of the television set to watch “Masterpiece Theater”—Joan Hess
  9. Her head , . . carried well back on a short neck, like a general or a statesman sitting for his portrait —Willa Cather
  10. He seemed enduringly fixed on the sofa, the one firm object in a turbulent world … like a lighthouse … the firm, majestic lighthouse that sends out its kindly light —Isak Dinesen
  11. He seemed to have collapsed into himself, like a scarecrow in the rain —Christopher Isherwood
  12. His chin hung on his hand like dead weight on delicate scales —Reynolds Price
  13. His erect figure carrying his white hair like a flag —John Updike
  14. His shoulders slumped like a man ready to take a beating —James Crumley
  15. His straight black hair and craggy face gave off a presence as formidable as an Indian in a gray flannel suit —Norman Mailer
  16. Holding herself forward [as she walks] like a present —Alice Adams
  17. I felt that if he [man with threatening presence] were to rise violently to his feet, the whole room would collapse like paper —Margaret Drabble
  18. Lay piled in her armchair like a heap of small rubber tires —Patricia Ferguson
  19. Leaned forward eagerly … looking like a bird that hears a worm in the ground —Robert Lowry
  20. A lofty bearing … like a man who had never cringed and never had a creditor —Herman Melville
  21. Looked like a prisoner in the dock, hangdog and tentative —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  22. Looking regal as a king —Gloria Norris
  23. Perched on her armchair like a granite image on the edge of a cliff —Edith Wharton
  24. (Sat) prim and watchful as a schoolgirl on her first field trip —Robert Traver
  25. Relaxed and regal as a Siamese cat —Harold Adams
  26. (They were mute, immobile, pale —as) resigned as prisoners of war —Ignazio Silone
  27. Sat like a bronze statue of despair —Louisa May Alcott
  28. Sat like a Greek in a tragedy, waiting for the gods to punish her for her way of life —Jonathan Valin
  29. Sat helpless and miserable, like a man lashed by some elemental force of nature —Flannery O’Connor
  30. Sat like a man dulled by morphine —Albert Maltz
  31. (The leading members of the Ministry) sat like a range of exhausted volcanoes —Benjamin Disraeli
  32. Sat on the arm of the sofa with a kind of awkward arrogance, like a workman in a large strange house —Paul Theroux
  33. (Professor Tomlinson) sat up in the witness chair like a battleship raising its most powerful gun turret into position to fire —Henry Denker
  34. She drew herself up with a jerk like a soldier standing easy called to stand-at-attention position —Kingsley Amis
  35. She holds up her head like a hen drinking —Scottish proverb
  36. She walked like a woman at her lover’s funeral —Derek Lambert
  37. She was still and soft in her corner [of the room] like a passive creature in its cave —D. H. Lawrence
  38. She wore defeat like a piece of cheap jewelry —Pat Conroy
  39. Slumped into her seat like a Pentecostal exhausted from speaking in tongues —Sarah Bird
  40. Spread his arms and went springy like a tennis player —Graham Swift
  41. Slumps in his chair like a badly hurt man, half life-size —Ted Hughes
  42. Standing like a lost child in a nightmare country in which there was no familiar landmark to guide her —Margaret Mitchell
  43. Standing … poised and taut as a diver —George Garrett

    See Also: PREPAREDNESS

  44. Standing still alone, she seemed almost somber, like a statue to some important but unpopular virtue in a formal garden —Douglas Adams
  45. Stands there like a big shepherd dog —Clifford Odets
  46. Stands there like a prizefighter, like somebody who knows the score —Raymond Carver
  47. Stands there vacantly, like a scared cat —Bobbie Ann Mason
  48. Stately [movement] like a sailing ship —William H. Gass
  49. Stood around casual as tourists —James Crumley
  50. Stood before them, like a prisoner at the bar, or rather like a sick man before the physicians who were to heal him —Edith Wharton
  51. Stood in one place, staring back into space and grinding fist into palm, like a bomb looking for someplace to go off —William Diehl
  52. Stood looking at us like a figure of doom —Edith Wharton
  53. Stood morosely apart, like a man absorbed in adding millions of pennies together, one by one —Frank Swinnerton
  54. Stood stiffly as a hanged man —Leigh Allison Wilson
  55. Stood … stiffly, like a page in some ancient court, or like a young prince expecting attention —Mary Hedin
  56. Stood there like an angry bull that can’t decide who to drive his horns in next —Danny Santiago
  57. Walked like a man through ashes, silent and miserable —Robert Culff

    See Also: DEJECTION, WALKING

  58. Went about looking as though she had had a major operation that had not proved a success —Josephine Tey
  59. Wore abuse like widow’s weeds —Lael Tucker Wertenbaker
  60. Wore their beauty and affability like expensive clothes put on for the occasion —Edith Wharton
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bearing - relevant relation or interconnection; "those issues have no bearing on our situation"
relatedness - a particular manner of connectedness; "the relatedness of all living things"
2.bearing - the direction or path along which something moves or along which it liesbearing - the direction or path along which something moves or along which it lies
direction, way - a line leading to a place or point; "he looked the other direction"; "didn't know the way home"
tack - the heading or position of a vessel relative to the trim of its sails
3.bearing - dignified manner or conductbearing - dignified manner or conduct    
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
gravitas, lordliness, dignity - formality in bearing and appearance; "he behaved with great dignity"
4.bearing - characteristic way of bearing one's bodybearing - characteristic way of bearing one's body; "stood with good posture"
bodily property - an attribute of the body
manner of walking, walk - manner of walking; "he had a funny walk"
slouch - a stooping carriage in standing and walking
gracefulness - beautiful carriage
clumsiness, awkwardness - the carriage of someone whose movements and posture are ungainly or inelegant
5.bearing - heraldry consisting of a design or image depicted on a shieldbearing - heraldry consisting of a design or image depicted on a shield
annulet, roundel - (heraldry) a charge in the shape of a circle; "a hollow roundel"
chevron - an inverted V-shaped charge
fleur-de-lys, fleur-de-lis - (heraldry) charge consisting of a conventionalized representation of an iris
heraldry - emblem indicating the right of a person to bear arms
ordinary - (heraldry) any of several conventional figures used on shields
6.bearing - a rotating support placed between moving parts to allow them to move easilybearing - a rotating support placed between moving parts to allow them to move easily
ball bearing, needle bearing, roller bearing - bearings containing small metal balls
fifth wheel - a steering bearing that enables the front axle of a horse-drawn wagon to rotate
journal bearing - the bearing of a journal
rotating mechanism - a mechanism that rotates
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
thrust bearing - a bearing designed to take thrusts parallel to the axis of revolution
Adj.1.bearing - (of a structural member) withstanding a weight or strainbearing - (of a structural member) withstanding a weight or strain
nonbearing - (of a structural member) supporting no vertical weight other than its own; "they took out a nonbearing wall"

bearing

noun
1. (usually with on or upon) relevance, relation, application, connection, import, reference, significance, pertinence, appurtenance My father's achievements don't have any bearing on what I do.
relevance irrelevance, irrelevancy, non sequitur, inappropriateness, inconsequence, inaptness
2. manner, attitude, conduct, appearance, aspect, presence, behaviour, tone, carriage, posture, demeanour, deportment, mien, air, comportment She later wrote warmly of his bearing and behaviour.
3. (Nautical) position, heading, course, direction, path, orientation, point of compass I'm flying on a bearing of ninety-three degrees.
plural noun
1. way, course, position, situation, track, aim, direction, location, orientation, whereabouts, sense of direction I lost my bearings and was just aware of cars roaring past.

bearing

noun
1. Behavior through which one reveals one's personality:
Archaic: port.
2. The compass direction in which a ship or an aircraft moves:
3. One's place and direction relative to one's surroundings.Often used in plural:
Translations
سِناد، نُقْطَةُ ارتِكازهَيـئَه ، مَظْهَر
chováníkuličkové ložiskopostoj
holdninglejeopførsel
csapágy
legalíkamsburîur; framkoma
duruşmil yatağıpozyatak

bearing

[ˈbɛərɪŋ] N
1. (= relevance) → relación f
this has no bearing on the matteresto no tiene relación or no tiene nada que ver con el asunto
this has a direct bearing on our futureesto influye directamente en nuestro futuro
2. (in navigation) → rumbo m
to take a bearing (on sth)tomar una demora (de algo)
to find or get one's bearings (fig) → orientarse
to lose one's bearings (fig) → desorientarse
3. (= posture) → porte m; (= behaviour) → comportamiento m, modales mpl
4. (Mech) → cojinete m
see also ball D
5. (Heraldry) → blasón m
see also armorial

bearing

[ˈbɛərɪŋ]
n
(= deportment) [person] → maintien m, allure f
(= connection, influence) → rapport m
to have a bearing on sth → influer sur qch
(in machine)roulement m (à billes)
(= orientation) to take a bearing (with compass)faire le point
to take a bearing off sth (= use as reference point) → s'orienter par rapport à qch
to get one's bearings, to find one's bearings (= orientate o.s.) → s'orienter (fig) (in situation)se repérer
to lose one's bearings (lit) (= lose one's way) → être désorienté(e) (fig) (= get confused) → perdre ses repèresbear market n (STOCK EXCHANGE)marché m baissier

bearing

n
(= posture)Haltung f; (= behaviour)Verhalten nt, → Auftreten nt, → Gebaren nt
(= relevance, influence)Auswirkung f (→ on auf +acc); (= connection)Bezug m(on zu); to have some/no bearing on somethingvon Belang/belanglos für etw sein; (= be/not be connected with)einen gewissen/keinen Bezug zu etw haben
(= endurance) to be beyond (all) bearingunerträglich or nicht zum Aushalten sein
(= direction) to take a bearingsich orientieren; to get a bearing on somethingsich an etw (dat)orientieren; to take a compass bearingden Kompasskurs feststellen; to get or find one’s bearingssich zurechtfinden, sich orientieren; to lose one’s bearingsdie Orientierung verlieren
(Tech) → Lager nt

bearing

[ˈbɛərɪŋ] n
a. (of person) → portamento
b. (relevance) bearing (on)attinenza (con)
c. (Tech) ball bearings nplcuscinetti mpl a sfere
d. (position) to take a compass bearingeffettuare un rilevamento con la bussola
to take a ship's bearings → fare il punto nave
to get or find one's bearings (fig) → orientarsi
to lose one's bearings (fig) → perdere l'orientamento

bear1

(beə) past tense bore (boː) : past participle borne (boːn) verb
1. (usually with cannot, ~could not etc) to put up with or endure. I couldn't bear it if he left.
2. to be able to support. Will the table bear my weight?
3. (past participle in passive born (boːn) ) to produce (children). She has borne (him) several children; She was born on July 7.
4. to carry. He was borne shoulder-high after his victory.
5. to have. The cheque bore his signature.
6. to turn or fork. The road bears left here.
ˈbearable adjective
able to be endured.
ˈbearer noun
a person or thing that bears. the bearer of bad news.
ˈbearing noun
1. manner, way of standing etc. a military bearing.
2. (usually in plural. sometimes short for ˌball-ˈbearings) a part of a machine that has another part moving in or on it.
ˈbearings noun plural
location, place on a map etc; The island's bearings are 10 North, 24 West.
bear down on
1. to approach quickly and often threateningly. The angry teacher bore down on the child.
2. to exert pressure on. The weight is bearing down on my chest.
bear fruit
to produce fruit.
bear out
to support or confirm. This bears out what you said.
bear up
to keep up courage, strength etc (under strain). She's bearing up well after her shock.
bear with
to be patient with (someone). Bear with me for a minute, and you'll see what I mean.
find/get one's bearings
to find one's position with reference to eg a known landmark. If we can find this hill, I'll be able to get my bearings.
lose one's bearings
to become uncertain of one's position. He's confused me so much that I've lost my bearings completely.

bear·ing

n. gestación; conexión; [in obstetrics];
___ down[second stage of labor] pujo, expulsión hacia afuera.
References in classic literature ?
I thought as much," returned the scout, glancing his eye upward at the opening in the tree-tops, "from the course it takes, and the bearings of the mountains.
Letters came, with armorial seals upon them, though of bearings unknown to English heraldry.
Preserving an interval of some few yards between itself and the ship, the Jeroboam's boat by the occasional use of its oars contrived to keep parallel to the Pequod, as she heavily forged through the sea (for by this time it blew very fresh), with her main-topsail aback; though, indeed, at times by the sudden onset of a large rolling wave, the boat would be pushed some way ahead; but would be soon skilfully brought to her proper bearings again.
He had to catch himself now and then, and lean against a building and get his bearings.
Black Sam, as he was commonly called, from his being about three shades blacker than any other son of ebony on the place, was revolving the matter profoundly in all its phases and bearings, with a comprehensiveness of vision and a strict lookout to his own personal well-being, that would have done credit to any white patriot in Washington.
They carry you out, just as they carry a sun-struck man to the drug store, and put you on, and help get you to rights, and fix your feet in the stirrups; and all the while you do feel so strange and stuffy and like somebody else -- like somebody that has been mar- ried on a sudden, or struck by lightning, or something like that, and hasn't quite fetched around yet, and is sort of numb, and can't just get his bearings.
So then I took the bearings of a woody island that was down the river a piece, and as soon as it was fairly dark I crept out with my raft and went for it, and hid it there, and then turned in.
His first object was to inform himself of the legal bearings of the approaching marriage on the future of the husband and the wife.
On one of them, which was a fringed scarf for a dress of ceremony, I saw the armorial bearings of a Noble, and the letter E.
I had looked into my affairs so often, that I had thoroughly destroyed any slight notion I might ever have had of their bearings.
It bore no emblem of the deceased's birth or quality, for armorial bearings were then a novelty among the Norman chivalry themselves and, were totally unknown to the Saxons.
Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I take up my pen in the year of grace 17 and go back to the time when my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman with the sabre cut first took up his lodging under our roof.