Beat Generation


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Beat Generation

n.
A group of American writers and artists popular in the 1950s and early 1960s, influenced by Eastern philosophy and religion and known especially for their use of nontraditional forms and their rejection of conventional social values.

[From beat, weary (coined by Jack Kerouac in 1948 to describe the disaffected underground urban youth culture of the time, but later associated with beat, rhythmic pulse beatitude).]

Beat Generation

n (functioning as singular or plural)
1. (Sociology) members of the generation that came to maturity in the 1950s, whose rejection of the social and political systems of the West was expressed through contempt for regular work, possessions, traditional dress, etc, and espousal of anarchism, communal living, drugs, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) a group of US writers, notably Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs, who emerged in the 1950s

Beat′ Genera′tion


n.
(often l.c.) members of the generation that came of age in the 1950s and espoused forms of mysticism and the relaxation of social inhibitions.
[1950–55; appar. beat, adj.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Beat Generation - a United States youth subculture of the 1950sbeat generation - a United States youth subculture of the 1950s; rejected possessions or regular work or traditional dress; for communal living and psychedelic drugs and anarchism; favored modern forms of jazz (e.g., bebop)
youth subculture - a minority youth culture whose distinctiveness depended largely on the social class and ethnic background of its members; often characterized by its adoption of a particular music genre
beatnik, beat - a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
As Watson demonstrated in his previous books - Strange Bedfellows: The First American Avant-Garde (Abbeville, 1991); The Birth of the Beat Generation (Pantheon, 1995); and The Harlem Renaissance (Pantheon, 1995) - he writes well and has a knack for plucking juicy narratives from seemingly dried-up eras and archives.
It is the summer of 1960 and the beat generation is in full swing in the comedy drama, starring Rik Mayall, above.
Hosting poetry slams in Borders stores across the country is a wonderful way to celebrate National Poetry Month, and honor the gifted writers of the Beat generation who continue to inspire new generations of poets.
The one contact he maintained in Canada was a correspondence with Harry Redl, an Austrian photographer living in Vancouver who became the chronicler of the American Beat generation of the fifties.
2] Across the country, hundreds of colleges and universities now offer courses that incorporate the literature of the Beat Generation, and in many instances, entire courses are dedicated to the lives, literature, and art of the Beats.
On the Road, first published in hardcover in 1957 six years after its completion, went on to become a bestseller and is considered the quintessential statement of the 1950's literary movement known as the Beat Generation.
And lots of cleverness that relies to a great extent on knowing that 1950s-60s scene that was the nearest Britain got to America's Beat Generation.
A timeline brackets the Beat Generation as beginning with a 1944 meeting between Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William S.
tram ride up to North Beach, the hangout of the Beat Generation who sold their subversive poems through the City Lights Bookstore, America's first paperback bookshop.
Kerouac's fame and success is not as a writer, but rather as the self- proclaimed spokesman for the Beat Generation.
This is by now an old story threatening to go stale--behind every shooting star of a male writer lies a sacrificing, enabling woman--and among the virtues of Brenda Knight's and Richard Peabody's new collections of writings by the women of the beat generation is that this story gets reinvigorated and recomplicated, if not wholly deconstructed.
This passage by Ann Douglas, from an essay in ``The Rolling Stone Book of the Beats: the Beat Generation and American Culture'' (edited by Holly George-Warren and published by Hyperion; $27.