Beaufort scale


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Beaufort scale

n.
A scale of wind force ranging from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane), corresponding with the velocity of wind at a set distance above ground or sea level.

[After Sir Francis Beaufort (1774-1857), British naval officer.]

Beaufort scale

n
(Physical Geography) meteorol an international scale of wind velocities ranging for practical purposes from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane force). In the US an extension of the scale, from 13 to 17 for winds over 64 knots, is used
[C19: after Sir Francis Beaufort (1774–1857), British admiral and hydrographer who devised it]

Beau′fort scale′

(ˈboʊ fərt)
n.
a scale for indicating the force or speed of wind, using numbers from 0 to 12 or sometimes 17.
[1855–60; after Sir Francis Beaufort (1774–1857)]

Beau·fort scale

(bō′fərt)
A scale for classifying the force of the wind, ranging from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). The scale was devised in 1805 as a means of describing the effect of different wind velocities on ships at sea.

Beaufort scale

(wind scale) A scale that rates the force of wind from 0 to 12, a rating of 0 being absolute calm and one of 12 being hurricane force.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Beaufort scale - an international scale of wind force from 0 (calm air) to 12 (hurricane)
calm air, calm - wind moving at less than 1 knot; 0 on the Beaufort scale
light air - wind moving 1-3 knots; 1 on the Beaufort scale
light breeze - wind moving 4-7 knots; 2 on the Beaufort scale
gentle breeze - wind moving 8-12 knots; 3 on the Beaufort scale
moderate breeze - wind moving 13-18 knots; 4 on the Beaufort scale
fresh breeze - wind moving 19-24 knots; 5 on the Beaufort scale
strong breeze - wind moving 25-31 knots; 6 on the Beaufort scale
moderate gale, near gale - wind moving 32-38 knots; 7 on the Beaufort scale
fresh gale - wind moving 39-46 knots; 8 on the Beaufort scale
strong gale - wind moving 47-54 knots; 9 on the Beaufort scale
whole gale - wind moving 55-63 knots; 10 on the Beaufort scale
storm, violent storm - a violent weather condition with winds 64-72 knots (11 on the Beaufort scale) and precipitation and thunder and lightning
hurricane - a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)
graduated table, ordered series, scale, scale of measurement - an ordered reference standard; "judging on a scale of 1 to 10"
2.Beaufort scale - a scale from 0 to 12 for the force of the windBeaufort scale - a scale from 0 to 12 for the force of the wind
system of measurement, metric - a system of related measures that facilitates the quantification of some particular characteristic
Translations
Beaufortova stupnice
Beaufortin asteikkoboforiasteikko
Beauforts skala

Beaufort scale

[ˈbəʊfətˌskeɪl] Nescala f Beaufort

Beaufort scale

References in periodicals archive ?
What number on the Beaufort scale represents a moderate wind?
Very strong winds, mainly in the southern and western coast are expected to reach 9 the Beaufort scale by evening the met service said on Tuesday.
While the Welsh game is not out of the storm-tossed waters just yet - squalls about their four franchises stropping off to join the English Premiership still circulate - in the last few days the tone of the very public statements and briefings has dropped a couple of notches down the Beaufort Scale.
Best at the top of the Beaufort Scale, I Am The Fire and Mayhem also impress, although routine ballads such as Dear Daughter are more of a mild breeze.
The craft has already had its first serious task - evacuating people from a grounded ferry in very heavy seas measuring 6+ on the Beaufort scale.
But he said this only happened in severe gales - Force 10 on the Beaufort Scale.
Mr Bray said when they boarded the cargo ship they were told the weather had hit 11 on the Beaufort scale, a level which 'causes damage to the superstructure of ships'.
If ever there was an occasion where football's 'life and death' existence was for once reduced by several knots on the beautiful game's Beaufort Scale, then this one at gale-battered Gresty Road was it.
The deaths came as sustained wind speeds of between 40mph and 60mph, the equivalent of force eight and 10 on the Beaufort Scale, were recorded across many parts of the UK.
He went on, in that obsessive way of his, to found the Met Office (fans of the Shipping News will note that Finisterre was recently rechristened FitzRoy in his honour) and invent the Beaufort Scale, as well as weather forecasting, then, as now, an imperfect art.
According to the council's brief, ``The spherical artworks draw a parallel with the Beaufort scale, used to measure wind speed.
The strong winds which battered many parts of Britain yesterday were classed between force eight and force ten on the Beaufort Scale.

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