Becquerel


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Bec·que·rel

 (bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
Family of French physicists, including Antoine César (1788-1878), a pioneer in electrochemistry; his son Alexandre Edmond (1820-1891), noted for his research on phosphorescence and spectroscopy; and his grandson Antoine Henri (1852-1908), who shared a 1903 Nobel Prize for his discovery of the radioactive properties of uranium.

bec·que·rel

 (bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
n. Abbr. Bq
The International System unit of radioactivity, equal to one nuclear decay or other nuclear transformation per second.

[After Antoine Henri Becquerel.]

Becquerel

(French bɛkrɛl)
n
(Biography) Antoine Henri (ɑ̃twan ɑ̃ri). 1852–1908, French physicist, who discovered the photographic action of the rays emitted by uranium salts and so instigated the study of radioactivity: Nobel prize for physics 1903

becquerel

(ˌbɛkəˈrɛl)
n
(Units) the derived SI unit of radioactivity equal to one disintegration per second. Symbol: Bq
[C20: named after Antoine Henri Becquerel]

Bec•que•rel

(ˌbɛk əˈrɛl)

n.
1. Alexandre Edmond, 1820–91, French physicist (son of Antoine César).
2. Antoine César, 1788–1878, French physicist.
3. Antoine Henri, 1852–1908, French physicist (son of Alexandre Edmond).

bec·que·rel

(bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
A unit used to measure the rate of radioactive decay. Radioactive decay is measured by the rate at which the atoms making up a radioactive substance are transformed into different atoms. One becquerel is equal to one of these atomic transformations per second.

Bec·que·rel

(bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
Family of French physicists, including Antoine César (1788-1878), one of the first investigators of electrochemistry; his son Alexandre Edmond (1820-1891), noted for his research on phosphorescence; and his grandson Antoine Henri (1852-1908), who discovered spontaneous radioactivity in uranium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Becquerel - French physicist who discovered that rays emitted by uranium salts affect photographic plates (1852-1908)Becquerel - French physicist who discovered that rays emitted by uranium salts affect photographic plates (1852-1908)
Translations

becquerel

[ˌbekəˈrel] Nbecquerelio m

becquerel

nBecquerel nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Their accomplishments led the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to award the Curies, jointly with Henri Becquerel, the Nobel Prize in physics for 1903.
One of these models anticipates a max concentration by mid-2015 of up to 27 becquerels per cubic metre of water; the other suggests no more than about two becquerels per cubic metre of water.
A record high 140,000 becquerels per litre of beta radiation was detected, compared with 59,000 becquerels on the previous day, the operator of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station said.
In 1903, Marie received her doctorate in science from the Sorbonne, the first woman in France to do so, and the Nobel Committee awarded Henri Becquerel and the Curies the Nobel Prize in Physics.
While the samples are well below the 500 becquerel per kilogram limit set by the authorities, the contaminated seafood still represents a health risk, especially to pregnant women and children, and it is being distributed over a wide area," said Wakao Hanaoka, Greenpeace Japan oceans campaigner.
Details of the 1903 Nobel Prize in physics awarded to Antoine Henri Becquerel, Pierre Curie, and Marie Curie.
Along with her husband and Becquerel, Curie was awarded in 1903 the Nobel Prize in physics for research into radioactivity.
Richard Swanson, president and chief technology officer of SunPower Corporation , was today awarded the prestigious Becquerel Prize for Outstanding Merits in Photovoltaics at the 21st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition in Dresden, Germany.
The Curies began researching radioactive elements after Henri Becquerel discovered, by chance, radioactive uranium.
The new a safety limit for plutonium in food will be one becquerel per kilogram.
Lambs brought down off the mountain are tested for their becquerel count: if they exceed approved levels, they are daubed with red paint and left to graze out the radioactivity on unaffected lowland, with pounds 1.
Photovoltaic technology has been around since its discovery by Edmond Becquerel in 1839.