Becquerel

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Bec·que·rel

 (bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
Family of French physicists, including Antoine César (1788-1878), a pioneer in electrochemistry; his son Alexandre Edmond (1820-1891), noted for his research on phosphorescence and spectroscopy; and his grandson Antoine Henri (1852-1908), who shared a 1903 Nobel Prize for his discovery of the radioactive properties of uranium.

bec·que·rel

 (bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
n. Abbr. Bq
The International System unit of radioactivity, equal to one nuclear decay or other nuclear transformation per second.

[After Antoine Henri Becquerel.]

Becquerel

(French bɛkrɛl)
n
(Biography) Antoine Henri (ɑ̃twan ɑ̃ri). 1852–1908, French physicist, who discovered the photographic action of the rays emitted by uranium salts and so instigated the study of radioactivity: Nobel prize for physics 1903

becquerel

(ˌbɛkəˈrɛl)
n
(Units) the derived SI unit of radioactivity equal to one disintegration per second. Symbol: Bq
[C20: named after Antoine Henri Becquerel]

Bec•que•rel

(ˌbɛk əˈrɛl)

n.
1. Alexandre Edmond, 1820–91, French physicist (son of Antoine César).
2. Antoine César, 1788–1878, French physicist.
3. Antoine Henri, 1852–1908, French physicist (son of Alexandre Edmond).

bec·que·rel

(bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
A unit used to measure the rate of radioactive decay. Radioactive decay is measured by the rate at which the atoms making up a radioactive substance are transformed into different atoms. One becquerel is equal to one of these atomic transformations per second.

Bec·que·rel

(bĕ-krĕl′, bĕk′ə-rĕl′)
Family of French physicists, including Antoine César (1788-1878), one of the first investigators of electrochemistry; his son Alexandre Edmond (1820-1891), noted for his research on phosphorescence; and his grandson Antoine Henri (1852-1908), who discovered spontaneous radioactivity in uranium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Becquerel - French physicist who discovered that rays emitted by uranium salts affect photographic plates (1852-1908)Becquerel - French physicist who discovered that rays emitted by uranium salts affect photographic plates (1852-1908)
Translations

becquerel

[ˌbekəˈrel] Nbecquerelio m

becquerel

nBecquerel nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The 11 cows all showed high levels of radioactive caesium, ranging from 1,530 to 3,200 becquerels per kilogram, compared with the legal limit of 500 becquerels, the Tokyo statement said.
According to Tokyo Governor Shintaro Ishihara, 210 becquerels of iodine-131
The level of becquerels was up 6,500-fold from Wednesday sampling, which stood at 61 becquerels, the report added.
the groundwater sample, collected Monday from an observation well located close to the Pacific Ocean, contained 9,000 becquerels of cesium-134 per liter and 18,000 becquerels of cesium-137 per liter.
Seabed samples collected some 15 kilometres (nine miles) from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant contained 1,400 becquerels of radioactive caesium-137 per kilogramme, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said.
Contamination levels are at 3 billion becquerels of cesium per liter of water and 13 billion becquerels of iodine per liter.
drinking water samples collected on Sunday in Tokyo, 10 becquerels in Tochigi
Tepco revealed that the water sample taken on Wednesday at a point in the drainage ditch, which is only 300 meters away from the ocean, contained 1,400 becquerels per liter of radioactive substances, the Japan Times reports.
TEPCO announced early Wednesday that the cesium-134 reading advanced further to 11,000 becquerels and that of cesium-137 climbed further to 22,000 becquerels.
According to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 77 becquerels of iodine was found per kilogram of water in Tochigi, 2.
According to the Japan Times, officials from Tepco said tritium in a groundwater sample from a monitoring well near the suspect tank that lost 300 tons of tainted water last month in a level 3 incident was exhibiting 64,000 becquerels per liter of radioactivity.
Tuesday's samples showed 11,000 becquerels of cesium-134 per liter and 22,000 Bq/L of cesium-137.