hypermobility

(redirected from Beighton score)
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Related to Beighton score: Marfan syndrome, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

hypermobility

(ˌhaɪpəməʊˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
(Medicine) med an extension of the joints beyond normal capacity
Translations
hyperlaxité

hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty

n. hipermobilidad, movilidad excesiva.
References in periodicals archive ?
13), (14) All subjects were assessed for the existence of GJH using the Beighton score (15) and for BJHS using the revised Brighton criteria.
A separate investigator evaluated each subject for joint hypermobility by using Beighton score which was calculated by doing five simple manoeuvres.
The researchers assessed hypermobility with the Beighton score in 2,901 teens enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) when the participants were a mean 13.
Main outcome measures were the Beighton score for joint hyper-flexibility, peak of TK and LL, range of hip ER, ratio TK/LL, and individual's height, weight and BMI.
Additionally, the Beighton score was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (p <- 0.
One helpful tool is the Beighton score, which assigns one point for each elbow and knee that can extend more than 10 degrees, one point for each thumb that can be apposed to the flexor surface of the forearm, one point for each fifth finger that can be dorsiflexed more than 90 degrees, and one point for placing the palms on the floor with the knees straight.
Purnell and colleagues' study of adolescent pre-professional ballet and theater students found a mean Beighton score of 4.
The Beighton score identifies symptoms such as the ability to passively dor-siflex the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint to 90 degrees or more, to oppose the thumb to the volar aspect of the ipsilateral forearm, or to place the hands flat on the floor without bending the knees.
The Beighton score identifies symptoms such as the ability to passively dorsiflex the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint to 90 degrees or more, to oppose the thumb to the volar aspect of the ipsilateral forearm, or to place the hands flat on the floor without bending the knees.