Benedictine

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Related to Benedictine Nuns: Dominican nuns, Carmelite nuns

Ben·e·dic·tine

 (bĕn′ĭ-dĭk′tĭn, -tēn′)
n.
A monk, nun, or oblate belonging to the Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Benedict of Nursia.

Ben′e·dic′tine adj.

Benedictine

n
1. (Christian Churches, other) a monk or nun who is a member of a Christian religious community founded by or following the rule of Saint Benedict
2. (Brewing) a greenish-yellow liqueur made from a secret formula developed at the Benedictine monastery at Fécamp in France in about 1510
adj
(Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to Saint Benedict, his order, or his rule

Ben•e•dic•tine

(ˌbɛn ɪˈdɪk tɪn, -tin, -taɪn)

n.
1.
a. a member of an order of monks founded at Monte Cassino by St. Benedict about A.D. 530.
b. a member of any congregation of nuns following the rule of St. Benedict.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to St. Benedict or the Benedictines.
[1620–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Benedictine - a monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint BenedictBenedictine - a monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint Benedict
Benedictine order, order of Saint Benedict - a Roman Catholic monastic order founded in the 6th century; noted for liturgical worship and for scholarly activities
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
2.Benedictine - a French liqueur originally made by Benedictine monksbenedictine - a French liqueur originally made by Benedictine monks
cordial, liqueur - strong highly flavored sweet liquor usually drunk after a meal
Adj.1.Benedictine - of or relating to Saint Benedict or his works
2.Benedictine - of or relating to the BenedictinesBenedictine - of or relating to the Benedictines  
Translations

Benedictine

[ˌbenɪˈdɪktɪn]
A. ADJbenedictino
B. Nbenedictino m

Benedictine

[ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktaɪn ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktiːn ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktɪn]
n (= monk, nun) → bénédictin(e) m/f
adj [abbey, monastery] → bénédictin(e)
a Benedictine monk → un bénédictin

Benedictine

n
(Eccl) → Benediktiner(in) m(f)
(= liqueur)Benediktiner m

Benedictine

[ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktɪn] adj & nbenedettino/a
References in periodicals archive ?
It was then taken over by Benedictine nuns and remained an abbey until the end of the last century, since when it has been a family home.
It was occupied by an order of Benedictine nuns as an abbey until the late 20th Century.
Father Patrick was appointed to his position as the senior Catholic advisor on prisons in the Ministry of Justice in London in 2013 and moved into the community of Benedictine Nuns at Tyburn, in Middlesex.
It was the home of Benedictine nuns from 1838 until quite recently - they only left in 2009 to move into a new abbey in Yorkshire.
THE Benedictine nuns at the iconic Kylemore Abbey and Gardens will be happy as the cash pile at their firm last year soared to almost [euro]350,000.
English, they were replaced by German Benedictine nuns who renamed it Holy Family Academy in 1922.
We had 12 years of Catholic education taught by Benedictine nuns and priests.
Muddying the waters further is the phenomenon of order shifting: 'Houses listed as Poor Clare monasteries at one time could be recognised as houses of tertiaries, Augustinian canonesses, or Benedictine nuns at another.
At the Benedictine abbot's request, Bishop Silvio Cesare Bonicelli of Parma issued a special decree, letting the fugitive sisters enter a monastery of Benedictine nuns.
This project necessitated much travelling, since the manuscripts of English Benedictine nuns are scattered in various libraries and archives, twelve of which I hoped to visit in northern France, Belgium and England.
With her long serge habit, make-up-free face and closely cropped hair hidden by a traditional wimple, she appears indistinguishable from her fellow Benedictine nuns.