Benedictine

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Related to Benedictines: Carmelites, Cistercians, Franciscans, Dominicans

Ben·e·dic·tine

 (bĕn′ĭ-dĭk′tĭn, -tēn′)
n.
A monk, nun, or oblate belonging to the Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Benedict of Nursia.

Ben′e·dic′tine adj.

Benedictine

n
1. (Christian Churches, other) a monk or nun who is a member of a Christian religious community founded by or following the rule of Saint Benedict
2. (Brewing) a greenish-yellow liqueur made from a secret formula developed at the Benedictine monastery at Fécamp in France in about 1510
adj
(Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to Saint Benedict, his order, or his rule

Ben•e•dic•tine

(ˌbɛn ɪˈdɪk tɪn, -tin, -taɪn)

n.
1.
a. a member of an order of monks founded at Monte Cassino by St. Benedict about A.D. 530.
b. a member of any congregation of nuns following the rule of St. Benedict.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to St. Benedict or the Benedictines.
[1620–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Benedictine - a monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint BenedictBenedictine - a monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint Benedict
Benedictine order, order of Saint Benedict - a Roman Catholic monastic order founded in the 6th century; noted for liturgical worship and for scholarly activities
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
2.Benedictine - a French liqueur originally made by Benedictine monksbenedictine - a French liqueur originally made by Benedictine monks
cordial, liqueur - strong highly flavored sweet liquor usually drunk after a meal
Adj.1.Benedictine - of or relating to Saint Benedict or his works
2.Benedictine - of or relating to the BenedictinesBenedictine - of or relating to the Benedictines  
Translations

Benedictine

[ˌbenɪˈdɪktɪn]
A. ADJbenedictino
B. Nbenedictino m

Benedictine

[ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktaɪn ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktiːn ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktɪn]
n (= monk, nun) → bénédictin(e) m/f
adj [abbey, monastery] → bénédictin(e)
a Benedictine monk → un bénédictin

Benedictine

n
(Eccl) → Benediktiner(in) m(f)
(= liqueur)Benediktiner m

Benedictine

[ˌbɛnɪˈdɪktɪn] adj & nbenedettino/a
References in classic literature ?
1830; The Bravo, 1831; The Heidenmauer, or the Benedictines, 1832; The Headsman, 1833; A Letter to his Countrymen, 1834; The Monikins, 1835; Sketches of Switzerland, 1836; Gleanings in Europe: 1837; (England)
She was a nun in the convent of the Benedictines of Templemar.
Because, monsieur, there is in front of the square tower of the Benedictines, towards the southern point, the bank of the
My instructor sometimes looked in upon me when he was out for an evening tramp, and I noticed that he was more likely to linger and become talkative if I had a comfortable chair for him to sit in, and if he found a bottle of Benedictine and plenty of the kind of cigarettes he liked, at his elbow.
lies buried at Reading, in the Benedictine abbey founded by him there, the ruins of which may still be seen; and, in this same abbey, great John of Gaunt was married to the Lady Blanche.
On that point," replied the bachelor, "opinions differ, as tastes do; some swear by the adventure of the windmills that your worship took to be Briareuses and giants; others by that of the fulling mills; one cries up the description of the two armies that afterwards took the appearance of two droves of sheep; another that of the dead body on its way to be buried at Segovia; a third says the liberation of the galley slaves is the best of all, and a fourth that nothing comes up to the affair with the Benedictine giants, and the battle with the valiant Biscayan.
The findings of Dr Kelly's study have been brought together in an open database of known Benedictines, available for scholars and the public alike to access.
He hopes the database will enable others to delve into the history of the Benedictines, including their social, regional and ethnic backgrounds, as well as explore how they contributed to the transfer of ideas between the continent and England.
Since 2012, the Benedictines have been the driving force for anti-trafficking efforts in Watertown, pulling together a widespread coalition of activists who travel up and down the eastern part of South Dakota and sometimes into Minnesota.
Kleespie and his brother Benedictines profess vows of stability, conversion, and obedience.
The Benedictines have done a phenomenal job in serving the community for almost 200 years, but I and many others are concerned about the long-term prospects for the graveyard.
ENLIGHTENED MONKS: THE GERMAN BENEDICTINES, 1740-1803.