mutation

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mu·ta·tion

 (myo͞o-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of being altered or changed.
2. An alteration or change, as in nature, form, or quality.
3. Genetics
a. A change in the nucleotide sequence of the genome of an organism or virus, sometimes resulting in the appearance of a new character or trait not found in the parental type.
b. The process by which such a change occurs, either through an alteration in the nucleotide sequence coding for a gene or through a change in the physical arrangement of the genetic material.
c. The nucleotide sequence, trait, or individual that results from such a change.
4. Linguistics
a. A change affecting a sound or a class of sounds, such as back vowels or plosive consonants, through assimilation to another sound, as in the process of umlaut.
b. A change affecting a sound or a class of sounds that is conditioned by morphological or syntactic factors rather than purely phonological factors, as in Irish, where certain words cause the lenition of the initial consonants of the following word.

[Middle English mutacioun, from Old French mutacion, from Latin mūtātiō, mūtātiōn-, from past participle of mūtāre, to change; see mutate.]

mu·ta′tion·al adj.
mu·ta′tion·al·ly adv.

mutation

(mjuːˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Genetics) the act or process of mutating; change; alteration
2. a change or alteration
3. (Genetics) a change in the chromosomes or genes of a cell. When this change occurs in the gametes the structure and development of the resultant offspring may be affected. See also inversion11
4. (Genetics) another word for mutant1
5. (Genetics) a physical characteristic of an individual resulting from this type of chromosomal change
6. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics
a. (in Germanic languages) another name for umlaut
b. (in Celtic languages) a phonetic change in certain initial consonants caused by a preceding word
muˈtational adj
muˈtationally adv

mu•ta•tion

(myuˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. Biol.
a. a sudden departure from the parent type in one or more heritable characteristics, caused by a change in a gene or a chromosome.
b. an individual, species, or the like resulting from such a departure.
2. the act or process of changing.
3. a change or alteration, as in form or nature.
4. a change in a speech sound caused by assimilation to a nearby sound, esp. umlaut.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
mu•ta′tion•al, adj.
mu•ta′tion•al•ly, adv.

mu·ta·tion

(myo͞o-tā′shən)
A change in the genes or chromosomes of an organism. Mutations occurring in the reproductive cells, such as an egg or sperm, can be passed from one generation to the next. Most mutations have harmful effects, but some can increase an organism's ability to survive. A mutation that benefits a species may evolve by means of natural selection into a trait shared by all members. See Note at sickle cell anemia.

Mutation

 of thrushes: group of moulting birds.

mutation

1. Inheritable change in a gene‘s DNA.
2. Change in a gene or genes of a living cell. A mutation in some way changes the cell’s characteristics and will be inherited. See chromosome, genes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutation - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alterationmutation - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alteration
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
freak, lusus naturae, monstrosity, monster - a person or animal that is markedly unusual or deformed
2.mutation - (genetics) any event that changes genetic structure; any alteration in the inherited nucleic acid sequence of the genotype of an organism
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
deletion - (genetics) the loss or absence of one or more nucleotides from a chromosome
inversion - (genetics) a kind of mutation in which the order of the genes in a section of a chromosome is reversed
transposition - (genetics) a kind of mutation in which a chromosomal segment is transfered to a new position on the same or another chromosome
mutagenesis - an event capable of causing a mutation
gene mutation, point mutation - (genetics) a mutation due to an intramolecular reorganization of a gene
reversion - (genetics) a return to a normal phenotype (usually resulting from a second mutation)
saltation - (genetics) a mutation that drastically changes the phenotype of an organism or species
3.mutation - a change or alteration in form or qualities
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"

mutation

noun
1. anomaly, variation, deviant, freak of nature Scientists have found a genetic mutation that causes the disease.
2. change, variation, evolution, transformation, modification, alteration, deviation, metamorphosis, transfiguration I was forced to watch my father's mutation from sober to drunk.

mutation

noun
1. The process or result of making or becoming different:
2. The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
mutace
mutation
stökkbreyting
変異突然変異

mutation

[mjuːˈteɪʃən] Nmutación f

mutation

[mjuːˈteɪʃən] nmutation f

mutation

n (= process)Veränderung f; (= result)Variante f; (Biol) → Mutation f; (Ling) → Wandel m(to zu)

mutation

[mjuːˈteɪʃn] nmutazione f

mu·ta·tion

n. mutación, alteración, cambios espontáneos o inducidos en la estructura genética.

mutation

n mutación f; BRCA — mutación BRCA
References in periodicals archive ?
Our laboratory has shown that introducing the beneficial mutation British-198 into blood cells using this technology substantially boosts their production of fetal hemoglobin.
Some ray-finned fishes preferentially diverged toward the evolution pathway of beneficial mutation, in which one duplicate is abandoned after duplication.
It works on what we understand with confidence to be random mutations in genes, some of which are destructive, most of which are benign, and a few of which lead to new traits in animals, plants, fungi, and single-cell life forms that afford an organism a competitive advantage in its environment, increasing the likelihood that it will reproduce more successfully than its fellows without the beneficial mutation, eventually leading to a new sub-species or an entirely new species.
Sam, a 55-year-old Amish farmer who declined to have his last name published, saying he was uncomfortable about being conspicuous, has such a beneficial mutation.
If an individual in an asexual species develops a beneficial mutation, it can pass it on only to its immediate offspring.
The Chinese have even started sending plant material into space to expose it to radiation in the hope a beneficial mutation will occur.
Resistance occurs when an organism develops a beneficial mutation, a random genetic change that lets it overcome a survival challenge--like exposure to Bt poison.
But the rest of us can probably get the same protection against the aging of the cardiovascular system that high levels of HDLs provide without carrying that beneficial mutation.
In this scenario, a beneficial mutation that confers faster replication may occur during the growth of a single plaque; the probability of picking this fitter clone from the plaque is disproportionaly large due to its elevated frequency.
Nevertheless, this can be done numerically, and the probability of fixing a beneficial mutation or a deleterious mutation can be calculated for each age using equation (A3), and equation (A6) can be solved to hold simultaneously for each age.
In a further extension of the accordion analogy, in addition to observing rapid gene expansion in the E3L-deficient strain of vaccinia, the researchers also observed that the virus contracted after acquiring an adaptive mutation, swapping a beneficial mutation for a smaller genomic footprint.
To assume strong synergistic epistasis of beneficial mutation effects (with f [less than] 0) would be biologically unrealistic; for the sake of symmetry the pleiotropic effects were assumed to combine multiplicatively also when f [greater than] 0.