Benthamism


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Ben·tham·ism

 (bĕn′thə-mĭz′əm)
n.
The utilitarian philosophy of Jeremy Bentham, holding that pleasure is the only good and that the greatest happiness for the greatest number should be the ultimate goal of humans.

Ben′tham·ite′ (-mīt′) n.

Benthamism

(ˈbɛnθəˌmɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophy of utilitarianism as first expounded by Jeremy Bentham in terms of an action being good that has a greater tendency to augment the happiness of the community than to diminish it
ˈBenthaˌmite n, adj

Benthamism

the philosophical theory of Jeremy Bentham that the morality of actions is estimated and determined by their utility and that pleasure and pain are both the ultimate Standard of right and wrong and the fundamental motives influencing human actions and wishes. — Benthamite, n.Benthamic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
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Let Benthamism reign, if men have no aspirations; but do not tell them to be romantic, and then solace them with glory; do not attempt by philosophy what once was done by religion.
First, he arranged for him to study law under John Austin, an eminent jurist and convert to Benthamism.
20) That the conservative Wemyss would cite Bentham in support of his opposition to Chamberlain's collectivism at first glance seems to vindicate Dicey's pronouncement of individualism as Benthamism.
But masochism cannot simply be confined to questions of desire; instead, it is offered to the reader as a Gothic or Romantic theory of knowledge, as a form of witnessing, as rigorous and existentially binding as that of Charlotte Bronte's Villette (1853) or of Dostoevsky's narrator in Notes From Underground (1864), who parodies the naivety of Benthamism when he notes that the human search for truth and freedom only begins when a person acts against their own interest.
This was opposed both to Benthamism and to the positive role of secular legislation, emphasising the idea of the survival of the fittest in an attempt to strengthen the liberal laissez-faire principle.
Their actions, while perceived, quite correctly by majority moral and legal positions, as being wrong, represents a kind of digital Benthamism where their actions, in their view, are creating efficiencies in the marketplace creating the greatest good for the greatest number which, in the end, is what the idea of just price really comes down to.
42) Finnis and others have argued that a rigorous application of Hart's method will extricate legal philosophy from Benthamism altogether by identifying the focal or paradigmatic case of law as just law--law that serves the common good--and the focal or paradigmatic case of the internal (or what Raz calls the "legal") point of view as the viewpoint of someone who understands law and legal systems as valuable to establish and maintain, and legal rules as ordinarily binding in conscience, insofar as they are just and, qua just, fulfill what natural law theorists contend is the justifying moral-critical point of law and legal systems--namely, to serve the common good.