Bergsonism


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Berg·son·ism

 (bĕrg′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The philosophy of Henri Bergson.

Berg·so′ni·an (-sō′nē-ən) adj. & n.

Bergsonism

(ˈbɜːɡsəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophy of Henri Bergson, which emphasizes duration as the basic element of experience and asserts the existence of a life-giving force that permeates the entire natural order. Compare élan vital

Bergsonism

the philosophy of Henri Bergson, emphasizing time or duration as the central f act of experience and asserting the existence of the élan vital as an original life force governing all organic processes in a way that can be explained only by intuition, not by scientific analysis. — Bergsonian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
There is a striking resemblance between this aspect of Bergsonism and the Sixth Patriarch's point that "All things have their own ways and therefore they do not hinder or afflict each other" ([phrase omitted]).
Fraser B (2008) Toward a philosophy of the urban: Henri Lefebvre's uncomfortable application of Bergsonism.
Deleuze's virtual finds its impetus in Bergson's theory of time, which, as Bergsonism reveals, offers a way of conceptualizing a unified heterogeneity.
While his approach more or less assumes that the reader of Counter-Archive comes pre-armed with a knowledge and understanding of Bergsonism, in particular, it allows Amad to provide a model for a way of writing film history and thinking about archival research that is fresh and inspiring.
Gilles Deleuze along with Felix Guattari discusses the issues of multiplicities in his book Bergsonism (1978) and delves into its political ramifications with Guattari in A Thousand Plateaus (1980).
In sections on conceptualizing Deleuze, Deleuze and aesthetics, and glossary, they discuss such topics as the invention of problems in Deleuze's Bergsonism, intensive multiplicities in A Thousand Plateaus, Essays Critical and Clinical, modernism and the imperceptible animal, Henry Miller and Deleuze's "strange Anglo-American literature, incorporeal modernism, body without organs, memory, and schizoanalysis.
Nazim Irem, "Undercurrents of European Modernity and the Foundations of Modern Turkish Conservatism: Bergsonism in Retrospect," Middle Eastern Studies, Vol.
4) The most obvious connection between vitalism and Deleuze undertaken in his book Bergsonism, but also in Deleuze's Difference and Repetition and A Thousand Plateaus, work to dismantle a rational subject in favor of multiplicities: potentially actualized selves in a state of becoming.
8) For a more complete explication of Deleuze's developing use of the term "virtual," see his book Bergsonism 51-73).
While it has perhaps been common to read Kazantzakis through Bergson, critics have tended to apply this approach only to his fiction, in the main con centrating on those aspects of Bergsonism most relevant to religious/spiritual concerns.
and the individual work of Gilles Deleuze entitled Bergsonism.
Gilles Deleuze, Bergsonism (New York: Zone Books, 1988), 17.