Bergsonism


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Berg·son·ism

 (bĕrg′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The philosophy of Henri Bergson.

Berg·so′ni·an (-sō′nē-ən) adj. & n.

Bergsonism

(ˈbɜːɡsəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophy of Henri Bergson, which emphasizes duration as the basic element of experience and asserts the existence of a life-giving force that permeates the entire natural order. Compare élan vital

Bergsonism

the philosophy of Henri Bergson, emphasizing time or duration as the central f act of experience and asserting the existence of the élan vital as an original life force governing all organic processes in a way that can be explained only by intuition, not by scientific analysis. — Bergsonian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gilles Deleuze along with Felix Guattari discusses the issues of multiplicities in his book Bergsonism (1978) and delves into its political ramifications with Guattari in A Thousand Plateaus (1980).
While his approach more or less assumes that the reader of Counter-Archive comes pre-armed with a knowledge and understanding of Bergsonism, in particular, it allows Amad to provide a model for a way of writing film history and thinking about archival research that is fresh and inspiring.
While it has perhaps been common to read Kazantzakis through Bergson, critics have tended to apply this approach only to his fiction, in the main con centrating on those aspects of Bergsonism most relevant to religious/spiritual concerns.
and the individual work of Gilles Deleuze entitled Bergsonism.
Gilles Deleuze, Bergsonism (New York: Zone Books, 1988), 17.
28) For more information see Gilles Deleuze, Bergsonism, trans.
1) Reading Bergson may have helped Faulkner arrive at his understanding of time, and critics have cited the influence of Bergsonism on Faulkner.
In the first half of his work, he surveys the unconscious in Russian and Scandinavian literature, in Bergsonism, in experimental psychology, and in psychoanalysis.