Berlin


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Ber·lin

 (bûr-lĭn′)
The capital and largest city of Germany, in the northeast part of the country. Founded in the 13th century, it was the capital of the kingdom of Prussia from 1701 and the capital of the German Empire (1871-1918), the Weimar Republic (1919-1933), and the Third Reich (1933-1945). The city was divided between 1945 and 1990 into East Berlin and West Berlin, which division grew out of the zones of occupation established at the end of World War II. The Berlin Wall, a wire and concrete barrier, was erected by the East German government in August 1961 and dismantled in November 1989.

ber·lin

or ber·line  (bər-lĭn′)
n.
A four-wheeled closed carriage with an exposed seat to the rear.

[After BerlinGermany.]

Berlin

(bɜːˈlɪn; German bɛrˈliːn)
n
(Placename) the capital of Germany (1871–1945 and from 1990), formerly divided (1945–90) into the eastern sector, capital of East Germany, and the western sectors, which formed an exclave in East German territory closely affiliated with West Germany: a wall dividing the sectors was built in 1961 by the East German authorities to stop the flow of refugees from east to west; demolition of the wall began in 1989 and the city was formally reunited in 1990: formerly (1618–1871) the capital of Brandenburg and Prussia. Pop: 3 388 477 (2003 est)

Berlin

(bɜːˈlɪn)
n
1. (Biography) Irving. original name Israel Baline, 1888–1989, US composer and writer of lyrics, born in Russia. His musical comedies include Annie Get Your Gun (1946); his most popular song is White Christmas
2. (Biography) Sir Isaiah. 1909–97, British philosopher, born in Latvia, historian, and diplomat. His books include Historical Inevitability (1954) and The Magus of the North (1993)

berlin

(bəˈlɪn; ˈbɜːlɪn)
n
1. (Textiles) (sometimes capital) Also called: berlin wool a fine wool yarn used for tapestry work, etc
2. (Automotive Engineering) a four-wheeled two-seated covered carriage, popular in the 18th century
3. (Automotive Engineering) a limousine with a glass partition between the front and rear seats
Also called (for senses 2, 3): berline
[C18: named after Berlin]

Ber•lin

(bərˈlɪn)

n.
1. Irving, 1888–1989, U.S. songwriter.
2. Isaiah, 1909–97, British philosopher and scholar, born in Russia.
3. the capital of Germany, in the NE part: constitutes a state. 3,472,009; 341 sq. mi. (883 sq. km). Formerly (1948–90) divided into a western zone (West Berlin), a part of West Germany; and an eastern zone (East Berlin), the capital of East Germany.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Berlin - capital of Germany located in eastern GermanyBerlin - capital of Germany located in eastern Germany
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
West Berlin - the part of Berlin under United States and British and French control until 1989
Berliner - an inhabitant of Berlin
2.Berlin - United States songwriter (born in Russia) who wrote more than 1500 songs and several musical comedies (1888-1989)
3.berlin - a limousine with a glass partition between the front and back seats
limo, limousine - large luxurious car; usually driven by a chauffeur
Translations
Berlin

Berlin

[bɜːˈlɪn]
A. NBerlín m
East/West BerlinBerlín Este/Oeste
B. CPDberlinés
the Berlin Wall Nel Muro de Berlín

Berlin

[bɜːrˈlɪn] nBerlin
East Berlin → Berlin Est
West Berlin → Berlin OuestBerlin Wall n
the Berlin Wall → le mur de Berlin

Berlin

nBerlin nt; the Berlin Walldie Mauer

Berlin

[bɜːˈlɪn] nBerlino f
East/West Berlin → Berlino est/ovest
References in classic literature ?
told me he was from Berlin, very learned and good, but poor as a church mouse, and gives lessons to support himself and two little orphan nephews whom he is educating here, according to the wishes of his sister, who married an American.
Today I am in Paris, tomorrow in Berlin, anon in Rome; but you would look for me in vain in the galleries of the Louvre or the common resorts of the gazers in those other capitals.
We were seized for the debts occasioned by their illness and their funerals, and placed among the attractions of a cheap museum in Berlin to earn the liquidation money.
Also, he was the translator of the famous book on "The Sensations of Tone," written by Helmholtz, who, in the period from 1871 to 1894 made Berlin the world-centre for the study of the physical sciences.
Perhaps even now they were destroying Berlin or Paris, or it might be they had gone northward.
Yes, yes, you can work with Berlin wools, and embroider handkerchiefs and collars--that will do little for you.
Perhaps, if all were known, the Marquis was not her kinsman at all, nor her mother, her mother; but there was evidence that, in Berlin, where we had first come across the pair, they had possessed acquaintances of good standing.
I learned dot trick in Mogoung Tanjong when I was collecting liddle monkeys for some peoples in Berlin.
I fancied myself at Berlin, Unter den Linden, and I reflected that, having taken the serious step of visiting the head-quarters of the Gallic genius, I should try and project myself; as much as possible, into the circumstances which are in part the consequence and in part the cause of its irrepressible activity.
Anyhow, the deputation of distinguished geologists and mineralogists from Paris and Berlin were there in the most magnificent and appropriate dress, for there are no men who like wearing their decorations so much as the men of science--as anybody knows who has ever been to a soiree of the Royal Society.
Thus, the doctor had become well known to the public, although he could not claim membership in either of the Royal Geographical Societies of London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, or St.
To them he was no more than a beach-comber in constant need of money, remarkable only for the peculiarity that he painted pictures which seemed to them absurd; and it was not till he had been dead for some years and agents came from the dealers in Paris and Berlin to look for any pictures which might still remain on the island, that they had any idea that among them had dwelt a man of consequence.