Baal Shem Tov

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Baal Shem Tov

 (bäl′ shĕm′ tōv′) Originally Israel ben Eliezer. 1698?-1760.
Polish-born Jewish religious leader and mystic who founded Hasidism.

Baal Shem Tov

(bɑːl ˈʃɛm tɒv; ˈʃɑːm) or

Baal Shem Tob

n
(Biography) original name Israel ben Eliezer ?1700–60, Jewish religious leader, teacher, and healer in Poland: founder of modern Hasidism
References in periodicals archive ?
The Besht is a sort of ceremonial robe worn by men in Qatar and other parts of the Gulf on special occasions.
When, in 1740, he moved to the "large, secure, and generally prosperous" town of Miedzyboz, the Besht was widely known.
This transition from the centrality of oral preaching to printed texts has first to do with competition over the status of the different disciples of the Besht.
The Baal Shem Toy, or Besht as his name came to be abbreviated, was an eighteenth-century Jewish mystic, part St.
1) Rabbi Israel ben Eliezer, also known as the BeShT, founded the eighteenth-century Jewish mystical movement of Hasidism.
The Jewish theatre company Besht Tellers in their latest show The Garden of Habustan explores the many problems afflicting Israeli society today and shows a country so haunted by its past that it is unable to create any kind of future.
It is in this perspective that, as emphasized by Gedaliah Nigal, the Hasidic tale was disseminated orally long before it was printed, ever since the lifetime of Besht.
Among the pilgrims there were people whom later Hasidic tradition came to recognize as the founding fathers of Hasidism: Nahman of Horodenka, Eleazar ben Samuel Rokeach, Gershon of Kuty, and last but not least, the Besht.
We would exchange the grave of the Besht [Baal Shem Tov] for a good Jewish Leonardo da Vinci," he wrote, jokingly but sincerely.
I'm jush quite really tired and emotional now, my lovely lovely lovely besht friends, but I really love you and I really think you should know that.
If the 1782 Edict of Toleration of Josef II was a major event for a Berlin Jew like Wessely, however pious he might have been, it was either ignored or feared by the followers of the Besht (Baal Shem Toy) who were numerous by the end of the eigh teenth century.