agonist

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ag·o·nist

 (ăg′ə-nĭst)
n.
1. Physiology A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, the antagonist.
2. A substance that can combine with a receptor on a cell to initiate signal transduction.
3. One involved in a struggle or competition.

[Late Latin agōnista, contender, from Greek agōnistēs, from agōn, contest; see agony.]

agonist

(ˈæɡənɪst)
n
1. (Physiology) any muscle that is opposed in action by another muscle. Compare antagonist2
2. a competitor, as in an agon
[C17: from Greek agōn agon]

ag•o•nist

(ˈæg ə nɪst)

n.
1. a person engaged in a contest, conflict, struggle, etc., esp. the protagonist in a literary work.
2. a person who is torn by inner conflict.
3. a contracting muscle whose action is opposed by another muscle. Compare antagonist (def. 3).
4. a chemical substance capable of activating a receptor to induce a full or partial pharmacological response. Compare antagonist (def. 5).
[1620–30; < Late Latin agōnista < Greek agōnistḗs contestant =agṓn agon + -istēs -ist]

ag·o·nist

(ăg′ə-nĭst)
A muscle that actively contracts to produce a desired movement. Compare antagonist.

agonist

one who contends for a prize in public games. — agonistic, agonistical, adj.
See also: Athletics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agonist - the principal character in a work of fictionagonist - the principal character in a work of fiction
antihero - a protagonist who lacks the characteristics that would make him a hero (or her a heroine)
2.agonist - someone involved in a contest or battle (as in an agon)agonist - someone involved in a contest or battle (as in an agon)
contestant - a person who participates in competitions
adversary, antagonist, opposer, resister, opponent - someone who offers opposition
3.agonist - a muscle that contracts while another relaxesagonist - a muscle that contracts while another relaxes; "when bending the elbow the biceps are the agonist"
antagonistic muscle - (physiology) a muscle that opposes the action of another; "the biceps and triceps are antagonistic muscles"
4.agonist - (biochemistry) a drug that can combine with a receptor on a cell to produce a physiological reaction
drug - a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic
biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
Translations
agonista
agonista
References in periodicals archive ?
today announced positive data from a study comparing a once-daily long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and a long-acting beta agonist (LABA) fixed-dose combination, Anoro Ellipta (umeclidinium/vilanterol 62.
VK2809 is a novel, orally available small molecule thyroid receptor beta agonist that possesses selectivity for liver tissue, as well as the beta receptor subtype, suggesting promising therapeutic potential in a range of lipid disorders.
61 TABLE 4 Reviews on Long Acting Beta Agonist Change in Rescue Bronchodilator Medication Use at End Point Year Inclusion # of tudies Walters, et al, 2002 (15) Randomized controlled trials 3 Appleton, et al, 2006 (16) Randomized controlled trials 5 Ni Chroinin, et al, 2009 (17) Randomized controlled trials 8 Ducharme, et al, 2010 (14) Randomized controlled trials 12 Average Year # of Patients Result Walters, et al, 2002 (15) 606 0.
With beta agonists, there is evidence of an acute desensitization of the beta receptor within minutes of exposure to a beta agonist, as well as longer term desensitization.
The Results: Fifty-five percent of the beta agonist prescriptions were filled, compared to 57% of the oral steroids prescriptions and 37% of the inhaled steroids.
According to the study, adding tiotropium bromide to low doses of inhaled corticosteroids is more effective at controlling asthma than doubling inhaled corticosteroids alone, and as effective as adding the long-acting beta agonist salmeterol.
Safety concerns regarding long-acting beta agonist (LABA) therapy date back to a major study reported more than 7 years ago, and a 2008 FDA meta-analysis indicated that treatment with LABAs--either alone or combined with an inhaled corti-costeroid (ICS)--is associated with an increased risk of severe asthma symptoms and hospitalizations as well as deaths in adults and children with asthma, compared with people not on a LABA.
That recommendation--to use a long-acting beta agonist (LABA) for "the shortest period of time required to achieve control of asthma symptoms and [to discontinue it], if possible, once asthma control is achieved," then use an asthma controller medication to maintain control--has raised concerns among some asthma treatment experts, who said this could be confusing for clinicians and patients.
1]) between 50-85% of the predicted value after withholding their beta agonist for at least 6 hours, (b) 15% FE[V.
today announced positive headline results from the landmark phase III IMPACT study of Trelegy Ellipta, the first and only FDA approved once-daily single inhaler triple therapy comprising an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and long-acting beta agonist (LABA).
It is a long-acting beta agonist (LABA) delivered through a propellant-free inhaler and is not indicated for the treatment of acute deteriorations of COPD and also for asthma.