beta-blocker

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Related to Beta-blockers: alpha-blockers

be·ta-block·er

 (bā′tə-blŏk′ər, bē′-)
n.
A drug that blocks beta-receptors, thus counteracting the excitatory effects of norepinephrine and other beta-agonists released from sympathetic nerve endings. Beta-blockers are used primarily to treat angina, hypertension, arrhythmia, and migraine. Also called beta-adrenergic antagonist, beta-adrenergic blocker.

beta-blocker

n
(Pharmacology) any of a class of drugs, such as propranolol, that inhibit the activity of the nerves that are stimulated by adrenaline; they therefore decrease the contraction and speed of the heart: used in the treatment of high blood pressure and angina pectoris
Translations

beta-blocker

nBetablocker m
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, beta-blockers have been shown to slow the progression of heart failure, improve its severity and reduce the risk of arrhythmias.
In experiments with a different mouse model of pancreatic cancer, the CUMC team demonstrated that treating mice with chemotherapy and nonselective beta-blockers, which are used to treat a variety of conditions, lived significantly longer than mice treated with chemotherapy alone.
APACHE-II scores and maximum HR<100/min were independent variables predicting ICU mortality in multivariate logistic regression analysis whereas usage of beta-blockers was not.
A 2013 stratified subset meta-analysis used data from landmark randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated beta-blockers vs placebo in patients with systolic heart failure to compare metoprolol succinate (MERIT-HF) vs placebo with bisoprolol (CIBIS-II), carvedilol (COPERNICUS), and nebivolol (SENIORS-SHF) vs placebo (table).
Generally, I think there is a consensus that beta-blockers are a poor choice for uncomplicated hypertension," Dr.
Beta-blockers work by blocking two hormones, adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are produced by the body and increase the heart rate and raise blood pressure.
This trial enrolled patients who, at baseline, were treatment naive to beta-blockers, diuretics, statins and calcium channel blockers, the latter being used as metabolically neutral controls.
The study also looked at the relationship between brain lesions at autopsy with beta-blocker treatment compared with other antihypertensive drugs, according to Dr.
Beta-blockers may not be as effective for many patients as was previously thought.
At the end of surgery, an investigator asked the anaesthetist to nominate their reasons for either initiating or not initiating perioperative beta-blockade in patients who were not already on beta-blockers as per the above definition using the following (one or more) alternatives:
Beta-blockers are commonly used in the treatment of hypertension (high blood pressure) to help reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease.
increased antidepressant use in patients prescribed beta-blockers.