bettong

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bettong

(bɛˈtɒŋ)
n
(Animals) a species of rat kangaroo of Australia having a short nose
[C19: from a native Australian language]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bettong - short-nosed rat kangaroobettong - short-nosed rat kangaroo    
rat kangaroo, kangaroo rat - any of several rabbit-sized ratlike Australian kangaroos
Bettongia, genus Bettongia - jerboa kangaroo
References in periodicals archive ?
Seebeck (1995) estimated the number of mammal species recorded pre-1854 to be 33, bearing in mind that some records of animals such as the bettongs, potoroos, flying-foxes and rats could not be assigned to a particular species.
Warnings are being given by the wildlife campaigners that cousins of the kangaroo, bettongs and rock-wallabies, are on the verge of extinction.
4%, N = 508 non-target species), particularly of rufous bettongs, and trap interference from these other species.
Bettongs, bandicoots, bilbies, smaller wallabies, native rodents, not to mention innumerable song birds and ground-dwelling birds, such as malleefowl and bush stone curlew, would all have a chance of returning to their previous ranges.
175) Pest and weed control is assisted by the introduction of geese and bettongs.
Recognised animals include: mammals with a live body weight of 1-3 kg (probably bettongs (Bettongia sp.
When I asked if we might catch a glimpse of a devil on Mount Paul, Virginia told me that they are usually quite reclusive, and that the main mammals they see on Mount Paul are wallabies (Bennetts and Rufous hare), possums (brushtail and ringtail), echidnas, wombats, quolls (Eastern and Spotted Tailed), devils, potoroos, pygmy possums and bettongs.
The first animals to be released will be Bilbies, followed by Bush-tailed Bettongs and Numbats.
Reedy Marsh contains areas of rare lowland and foothills, damp sclerophyll forests and provides intact habitat for threatened fauna including bettongs, quolls, Tasmanian wedge-tailed eagles and grey goshawks.
Noble (1993) showed that large circular features in central Australia with altered distributions of calcrete were probably the result of the warrens of burrowing bettongs (Bettongia lesueur), a species of rat-kangaroo absent from the survey area for many decades.
In Australia, burrowing bettongs (Bettongia lesueur), a small macropod marsupial the size of rabbits, now extinct on the mainland, were thought to structure the vegetation over large areas of Acacia shrubland (mulga) (Noble 1999, Noble et al.