bezoar

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be·zoar

 (bē′zôr′)
n.
A hard indigestible mass of material, such as hair, plant fibers, or seeds, found in the stomach or intestine of animals, especially ruminants and sometimes humans. Bezoars were formerly considered to be antidotes to poisons and to possess magic properties.

[Middle English bezear, stone used as antidote to poison, probably from Old French bezahar, gastric or intestinal mass used as antidote to poison, from Arabic bāzahr, from Persian pādzahr : pād-, protector (from Avestan pātar-; see pā- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots) + zahr, poison (from Middle Persian; see gwhen- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

bezoar

(ˈbiːzɔː)
n
(Medicine) a hard mass, such as a stone or hairball, in the stomach and intestines of animals, esp ruminants, and man: formerly thought to be an antidote to poisons
[C15: from Old French bézoard, from Arabic bāzahr, from Persian bādzahr, from bād against + zahr poison]

be•zoar

(ˈbi zɔr, -zoʊr)

n.
a calculus or concretion found in the stomach or intestines of certain animals, esp. ruminants, formerly reputed to be an effective remedy for poison.
[1470–80; bezear < Medieval Latin bezahar < Arabic bā(di) zahr < Persian pād-zahr counterpoison]
Translations

be·zoar

n. bezoar, concreción formada de distintas materias tal como fibras vegetales y pelo, presente en el estómago tanto en el intestino humano como el de los animales.

bezoar

n bezoar m
References in periodicals archive ?
Mentions of the bezoars take up from a few lines to entire chapters in Early Modern texts and I developed the conviction that, in the past, bezoar stones must have played a part in many people's lives.
3) But the story I would like to tell takes place between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which was the heyday of bezoar stones.
In his letter, proudly quoted by Monardes, Osma reports having learned about the Asian bezoars from Monardes' essay and discovered bezoar stones in Andean animals, samples of which he sent along to the well-known physician so that he could examine and test them in his practice of medicine.
According to Cristobal Acosta, bezoar stones were commonly used in India, Persia, the Arabian Peninsula and China, and he reported that those who went hunting for the bezoar were able to identify which animals were carrying a bezoar inside by their behavior.
Mounted Bezoar Stones, Seychelles Nuts, and Rhinoceros Horns: Decorative Objects as Antidotes in Early Modern Europe.
Mustika pearls are related to bezoar stones and some of them are of the latter.
nor about bezoar stones, the gall stones of monkeys (mostly of the grey langur, Presbytis hosei).
Taken back to Portugal, these bezoar stones were widely used by the elite for their medicinal and amulet qualities.
They studied the bezoar stones in the numbles of oxen and preached cracked doctrines which, unchecked, might unleash mischief in the world.