hate crime

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hate crime

n.
A crime motivated by prejudice against a social group: "[His]murders were hate crimes targeting victims by gender" (Jane Caputi and Diana E.H. Russell).

hate crime

n
(Law) a crime, esp of violence, in which the victim is targeted because of his or her race, religion, sexuality, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
But even more surprising than the sudden indictment in the cold case was Ashcroft's decision to invoke a little-known federal law, the 1994 Hate Crime Sentencing Enhancement Act, which increases penalties for bias crimes that take place on federal lands.
Lawrence notes that the issues raised by bias crimes and the punishment of those crimes implicate "three fundamental values of the American polity: equality, free expression, and federalism" (p.
She then proceeded to assess the human rights issues in the United States, citing police brutality, bias crimes against Muslims and other faults.
Chuck Deaton said 10 hate or bias crimes have been reported in the past five years that involved name-calling, none of them assaults on African-Americans.
Individuals can report bias crimes to the authorities and cooperate in their investigation.
Left unchallenged, hate of any kind harms our nation and can lead to bias crimes.
The money will go to groups that support victims of bias crimes.
NEW YORK: New York police are investigating as bias crimes four Molotov cocktail attacks on Sunday night including one against a mosque with 75 people inside and another against a Hindu place of worship.
Attaching the collection of hate crime statistics to the established UCR data collection procedures, they concluded, would fulfill the directives of the Hate Crime Statistics Act without placing an undue additional reporting burden on law enforcement and, in time, would develop a substantial body of data about the nature and frequency of bias crimes occurring throughout the nation.
Individual articles address such topics as science and pseudo-science in law enforcement, psychopathy and pathological behaviors, confession evidence, issues in victim reporting of sexual and bias crimes and challenges for mentally ill correctional inmates.
Nearly 500,000 college students across the country are targets of bias crimes each year, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.
Is a prominent federal role in the prosecution and punishment of bias crimes consistent with the proper division of authority between state (and local) government and the federal government in our political system?