bonny

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bon·ny

also bon·nie  (bŏn′ē)
adj. bon·ni·er, bon·ni·est Scots
1. Physically attractive or appealing; pretty.
2. Excellent.

[Probably ultimately from French bon, good, from Latin bonus; see deu- in Indo-European roots.]

bon′ni·ly adv.
bon′ni·ness n.

bonny

(ˈbɒnɪ)
adj, -nier or -niest
1. dialect Scot and Northern English beautiful or handsome: a bonny lass.
2. merry or lively: a bonny family.
3. good or fine: a bonny house.
4. (esp of babies) plump
5. dialect Scot and Northern English considerable; to be reckoned with: cost a bonny penny.
adv
informal agreeably or well: to speak bonny.
[C15: of uncertain origin; perhaps from Old French bon good, from Latin bonus]
ˈbonnily adv

Bonny

(ˈbɒnɪ)
n
(Placename) Bight of Bonny a wide bay at the E end of the Gulf of Guinea off the coasts of Nigeria and Cameroon. Former name (until 1975): Bight of Biafra

bon•ny

(ˈbɒn i)

adj. -ni•er, -ni•est. Chiefly Brit.
1. attractive; handsome; pretty.
2. pleasing; agreeable.
[1425–75; late Middle English (Scots) bonie]
bon′ni•ly, adv.
bon′ni•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bonny - very pleasing to the eye; "my bonny lass"; "there's a bonny bay beyond"; "a comely face"; "young fair maidens"
beautiful - delighting the senses or exciting intellectual or emotional admiration; "a beautiful child"; "beautiful country"; "a beautiful painting"; "a beautiful theory"; "a beautiful party"

bonny

adjective (Scot. & Northern English dialect) beautiful, pretty, fair, sweet, appealing, attractive, lovely, charming, handsome, good-looking, gorgeous, radiant, alluring, comely She was a bonny highland lassie.

bonny

adjective
2. Scots. Having pleasant desirable qualities:
Scots: braw.
Translations

bonny

[ˈbɒnɪ] ADJ (bonnier (compar) (bonniest (superl))) (esp Scot) (= pretty) [child] → hermoso, lindo (esp LAm); [dress] → bonito, lindo (esp LAm)

bonny

[ˈbɒni] adj (Scottish)joli(e)

bonny

[ˈbɒnɪ] adj (esp Scot) → bello/a, carino/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, those of us who studied history or especially geography before 1970 knew that the body of the Atlantic Ocean below Nigeria were known and called the Bight of Benin west of the River Niger and the Bight of Biafra to the east of same.
Nevertheless, Imbua's intervention in contemporary debates in Calabar gives the book a poised balance between addressing the historicity of its subject and the importance of those debates, and makes it a worthy companion to Nwokeji's recent history of the slave trade in the Bight of Biafra.
The transatlantic slave trade operated very differently along the Gold Coast than it did in the Bight of Biafra and differently again in West Central Africa.
Archibald John Monteath, born Aniaso sometime in the 1790s in what is now southeastern Nigeria, was captured as a child, traded out of a port on the Bight of Biafra such as Bonny or Calabar, and sent via the slave trade to Jamaica in 1802.
The story is told from the primary vantage point of the Bight of Biafra, a major exporting region, extending from the Niger Delta in modern Nigeria to Cape Lopez in modern Gabon.
Africans from the Bight of Biafra, likely Igbo speakers and others, represented 34.
Parts of the territories of both countries are located in the Bight of Biafra, an arm of the Atlantic Ocean, and the southernmost part of Nigeria in the Niger Delta area is only a little over a hundred kilometers to Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea, located on Bioko Island.
Rucker argues that the acculturated figure described by Egerton would have had little appeal in the Virginia countryside where recent arrivals were from the Bight of Biafra.