akedah

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akedah

(əˈkaɪdɑː)
n
the Biblical story known as the Binding of Isaac, Genesis 22:1-24
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The story of the binding of Isaac, which appears in both the Hebrew Bible (Gen.
Continue reading "With the Binding of Isaac, Did Abraham Fail His Big Test?
If Islam is aware of historical events preceding it, how can it change such things as the binding of Isaac to the 'binding of Ishmael' and create an entire festival around it?
Released during the twin peaks of Cold War tension, Fail-Safe (1964) and WarGames (1983) reinterpret the Binding of Isaac, also known as the Akedah.
In christianity, Abraham's binding of Isaac operates as a caesura, a moment that tore apart the fabric of the social, leaving the frayed strings to dangle in the void of faith.
Following hard upon this familial happiness, the binding of Isaac tests Abraham and tempers this concept of comedy.
an analysis of how Christians and Jews interpret the binding of Isaac to highlight their central beliefs.
In the binding of Isaac case, it is God who asks Abraham to sacrifice his son, and this time Abraham, far from questioning the divine decision, meekly proceeds to execute the command.
Similarly Cohen repeatedly draws on the biblical story of the binding of Isaac for countless images intended to portray the lives of Israeli Jews as a ceaseless and frequently deadly religious trial.
6) Moreover, the location in which Asher paints the crucifixions foreshadows Potok's subversion of the myth of the Binding of Isaac in the second novel, which will be explored below.
The binding of Isaac (akedah) has long been recognized as one of the most challenging yet illuminating texts of the Hebrew Bible.
Unusually, Forte links the theme of beauty to the scenario of the Abraham's binding of Isaac that lies at the heart of Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling, but, as Forte comments, 'without a passion for beauty not even Abraham could have loved Isaac and been prepared to offer him in sacrifice on the holy mountain' (p.