biocentric

bi•o•cen•tric

(ˌbaɪ oʊˈsɛn trɪk)

adj.
centered in life; having life as its principal fact.
[1885–90]
Translations
biocentrique
References in periodicals archive ?
His argument runs as follows: Rand's biocentric analysis of value establishes that
6:19-21) and afterwards formed a biocentric covenant with "every living creature" (Gen.
Blacks in this study held somewhat anthropocentric worldviews when economic issues were involved and biocentric worldviews when economic sacrifices were not involved.
Sanders and Arluke hold that anthropomorphism is a useful heuristic device (2007: 63) while Bekoff argues for a biocentric approach that supports the animal's point of view while still acknowledging that we, of necessity, are still human (2007: 73).
The first wave includes humanist, anthropocentric, biocentric, and ecocentric ideologies.
com)-- Rick Popowitz, President and CEO of Biocentric Health, Inc.
28) I borrow the arithmetics of skin from Browne because her work uncovers the ways in which contemporary surveillance practices are inflected with the relief of neutrality as they track biocentric human markers: race, gender, a two-sexed system.
Topics include the green politics of Alasdair MacIntyre and Vaclav Havel, the politics of global warming, mindfulness as a new commons, territorial claims in a world of limits, the political unrealism of making meta-ethical demands for non-anthropocentrism in environmental ethics, and critique of the biocentric egalitarianism of deep ecology.
8) The first two of these three types of self-construal can be considered anthropocentric (moreover, egoistic and altruistic respectively), the third eco- or biocentric.
Norris, for example, bans Hemingway from the biocentric tradition for aestheticizing animals (198).
The message that is conveyed is that we need to maintain this pristine environment for human consumption and benefit--an anthropocentric view of the environment, rather than a biocentric view that considers humans as one element in the whole environmental system.