biofilm

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bi·o·film

 (bī′ō-fĭlm′)
n.
A complex structure adhering to surfaces that are regularly in contact with water, consisting of colonies of bacteria that secrete a mucilaginous protective coating in which they are encased. Biofilms, which are resistant to antibiotics and disinfectants, corrode pipes and cause diseases such as lung infections, but they can be used beneficially to treat sewage, industrial waste, and contaminated soil.

biofilm

(ˈbaɪəʊˌfɪlm)
n
(Microbiology) a thin layer of living organisms
Translations
biofilm
References in periodicals archive ?
Candida biofilms on implanted medical devices and on the oral, esophageal, and vaginal mucosa are well documented.
We conducted a prospective observational study of tracheostomy tubes with three primary goals: (I) to identify the presence and location of bacterial biofilms on adult tubes, (2) to determine how soon after insertion of a tube the presence of a biofilm could be identified, and (3) to identify the bacterial organisms that formed the biofilms on these tubes.
Biofilms are known for their high level of antimicrobie resistance and resilience to host defense mechanisms.
Scientists at The Ohio State University used microarray analysis to find molecular determinants and pathways potentially involved in the formation of these biofilms.
Biofilms may form on living or non-living surfaces, and represent a prevalent mode of microbial life in natural, industrial and hospital settings (1).
When bacteria attach to and colonise the surfaces of food processing equipment and the food products themselves, there is a risk that biofilms may form.
Applied biomedical microbiology; a biofilms approach.
ARS microbiologist Judy Arnold at the Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit in Athens, Georgia, has been looking for improved methods to control biofilms containing L.
I just got a [2007] medical microbiology text and it does not mention biofilms," he noted, suggesting maybe that was why most of the audience might not have heard of these concepts.
Microbial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria and are common in the human body and in the environment.
Bacteria can quickly attach to the surfaces of produce and form biofilms that likely improve their ability to colonize and survive.
Purpose: The present study investigated the antifungal effect of 2',4,-dihydroxy-5'-(1'",1'"-dimethylallyl)- 8-prenylpinocembrin (8PP, formerly 6PP), a natural prenylflavonoid, on Candida albicans biofilms, and compared this with an azole antifungal (fluconazole) by studying the cellular stress and antioxidant response.