biolinguistics


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biolinguistics

the study of the relations between physiology and speech. — biolinguist, n.
See also: Linguistics
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2007), "Of Minds and Language," Biolinguistics 1: 9-27.
It may be the case, as I explore elsewhere (2003, 2014) that we are missing something; while the term biolinguistics has been taken to mean an evolutionary account of language, within the biosemiotics community there is a move afoot toward a truly general account of symbolic functioning, one that encompasses all its manifestations in biology.
Recursion in language: A layered-derivation approach, Biolinguistics, 5, 43-56.
For biolinguistics the logical-conceptual system interfaces with the sensory-motor system, arguably in an asymmetrical relation.
More specifically, contributions discuss Harrison's thinking in connection with Dickens, Wittgenstein, and Donne, and on themes including the English novel, antisemitism, the limits of biolinguistics, and language and fiction.
Key topics addressed include the ways in which Chomsky distinguishes between his own "rationalist" scientific approach to the sciences of language and mind versus the "empiricist" approach (which neither McGilvray nor Chomsky believe deserves the appellation), the growth of biolinguistics and Chomsky's role in its development, the importance of biolinguistics for understanding Chomsky's attempts to construct a science of human nature, how these issues are incorporated into Chomsky's "Enlightenment project" of coming to understand humans as natural objects with language and an innate moral sense, and the ways in which this project is connected to his political interventions.
2009): "Computational phenotypes: Where the theory of computation meets Evo-Devo", Biolinguistics, 3/1, pp.
To better examine why this is so, Fitch (Chapter 1) says we need to develop a better science of biolinguistics.
Full interpretation of optimal labelling Biolinguistics 3: 213-254.
It is comprised of twenty-three papers and amounts to a snapshot of the issues and problems currently animating the field of biolinguistics, where language is understood as a biological system of the human mind/brain.
Hinzen remarks that it is a classical assumption of Chomskyan biolinguistics that the human language faculty undergoes state changes during human development in the light of experiential data.