biofouling

(redirected from Biological fouling)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to Biological fouling: Microfouling

bi·o·foul·ing

 (bī′ō-fou′lĭng)
n.
The impairment or degradation of something, such as a ship's hull or mechanical equipment, as a result of the growth or activity of living organisms.

bi′o·foul′er n.

biofouling

(ˈbaɪəʊˌfaʊlɪŋ)
n
the degradation of an artificial surface by biological growth
References in periodicals archive ?
When towers do not have proper maintenance many different extremely costly problems appear primarily scale formation, corrosion and biological fouling that reduces the efficiency of the cooling towers by 70%.
The Qatar Ministry of Environment has concurred with Qatargas to acknowledge the technology as a method to control biological fouling in its seawater cooling system and satisfying regulatory concerns over the use of hypochlorite in once through seawater cooling water systems.
The requirements for marine coating systems carry a tall order, including the protection of vessels and structures in harsh and diverse environmental conditions (saltwater immersion, extreme temperatures, ultraviolet radiation exposure, humidity, physical impact from wave action, biological fouling [barnacles], etc.
In cooling tower applications, four major mechanisms of fouling are expected: (a) precipitation fouling (scaling), (b) biological fouling (slime), (c) corrosion fouling, and (d) particulate fouling (sedimentation) (Haider, et al.
In cooling tower applications, four major mechanisms of fouling are expected: (1) precipitation fouling (scaling), (2) biological fouling (slime), (3) corrosion fouling, and (4) particulate fouling (sedimentation) (Haider et al.
Marine biological fouling is defined as the undesirable accumulation of microorganisms, plants, and animals on artificial surfaces immersed in seawater.
Like the original model, this one uses a patented bimetallic process media to prevent scale formation, remove existing scale, control biological fouling, and inhibit corrosion--all without chemicals.
Chemical treatment, such as chlorine, may be used to control these growths to avoid a reduction in heat transfer capabilities and to minimize biological fouling on metal surfaces.
water and wastewater utility company, announced today that it received a grant from the WateReuse Research Foundation to conduct a joint research project with Drexel University to measure and reduce biological fouling on membrane filters in desalination applications.
1981), including: particulate fouling, crystalline or precipitation fouling, chemical reaction fouling, corrosion fouling, and biological fouling or biofouling.
In addition, showing the growth of some types of biological materials on HVAC heat exchangers in typical buildings is important to help building operators implement solutions to biological fouling of such units.