biomagnification


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Related to biomagnification: bioaccumulation

bi·o·mag·ni·fi·ca·tion

 (bī′ō-măg′nə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
The increasing concentration of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in the tissues of organisms at successively higher levels in a food chain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biomagnification of mercury in aquatic food webs: a worldwide meta-analysis.
Frank AP, Gobas C, Wilcockson JB, Russell RW, Haffner GD (1998) Mechanism of Biomagnification in Fish under Laboratory and Field Conditions Environ sci technol 33: 133-141.
This is the first report of biomagnification of a trace element across 3 trophic levels involving P.
Carnivorous fish, especially tuna, are considered to have higher mercury levels because of a process called biomagnification.
Thus there is a serious danger to the fauna and flora due to bioacccumulation, long persistence and biomagnification in the food chains of these pollutants [2].
In [4] It was determined the presence in the milk of pesticides such as organophosphates and triazine product of processes of bioaccumulation and biomagnification, this was performed using techniques of gas chromatography.
On the other hand pesticides are commonly known by the toxic effects that occur in health, it is for this reason that have developed different studies and have generated measures to curb this, but even so there are multiple factors that make it difficult to proper disposal of these before they are harmful to the health, as are the processes of bioaccumulation and biomagnification.
Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of mercury in African lakes: the importance of trophic status.
These elements are posing threat to the survival of the fish because these heavy metals can persist in living bodies for a longer period of time and have high potential for bioaccumulation and biomagnification in the food chain (Ozparlak et al.
Biomagnification is even greater when dealing with the organic forms of mercury (Kehrig et al.
For instance, PBDEs are lipophilic, resulting in bioaccumulation in organisms and biomagnification in food chains (Robinson, 2009).