biomagnification

(redirected from Biomagnify)
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bi·o·mag·ni·fi·ca·tion

 (bī′ō-măg′nə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
The increasing concentration of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in the tissues of organisms at successively higher levels in a food chain.
References in periodicals archive ?
MeHg is the only form of mercury to biomagnify in food webs, reaching concentrations in predatory species such as shark, tuna, and swordfish that are at least a million times higher than seawater (Lavoie et al.
The substances present in e-waste have the capacity to bioaccumulate and biomagnify along the food chain.
When carnivorous fish consume toxic herbivorous fish, the toxins can accumulate in them as well, allowing the toxins to biomagnify up the coral reef food chain.
The main reason behind this rapid lose is that Cr(VI) not only cumulated in tissues during aquatic organisms growth (bioaccumulation) but also biomagnify up the food chain and thus fish faced both metallic stress as well as starvation.
over time, biomagnify, causing widespread, long-term, and severe damage
This variation may be attributed on one hand, to their habitats and on the other hand to their inherent abilities to biomagnify the heavy metals.
Remote camera observations revealed that the nestlings died shortly after consuming sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), a fish species known to biomagnify saxitoxin.
Large number of experiments proved that PBDEs including BDE-209 persist in the environment for long time (de Wit 2002), and bioaccumulate and biomagnify as they move through the food chain (Law et al.
Numerous of these chemical contaminants are persistent polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons known to bioaccumulate and biomagnify as they move through the aquatic food web, affecting species associated with aquatic systems, including humans (GIESY et al.
Given the ability of fish to bioaccumulate and biomagnify high concentrations of these elements through the aquatic food chain, and the fact that these animals are constituted as representatives from various levels of the same chain they are consider excellent indicators of heavy metal pollution.
The succeeding lower bio concentration factor, in higher trophic animals, indicates that thorium will not biomagnify in the aquatic environment.
Although it can persist in sediments and accumulate in sediment-dwelling organisms, it does not biomagnify through the food chain.