bipyramidal


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bipyramidal

(ˌbaɪˈpɪrəmɪdəl)
adj
relating to a symmetrical structure consisting of two pyramids
References in periodicals archive ?
Although, bipyramidal shape and presence of intercalated fat were pathognomonic for thymic hyperplasia, not all of them exhibit these features on CT.
Additionally, according to information from the research team, the pigment has a crystal structure in which the chromophore that produces its intense blue is in a trigonal bipyramidal site, which means that the color can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of indium to magnesium.
Out of thirty colonies, eleven colonies showed bipyramidal or bipyramidal with cuboidal crystalline inclusions (Fig 1).
Symmetry between S and R blocks symmetry breaks due to trigonal bipyramidal 2b site.
Crans, "Vanadium-phosphatase complexes: phosphatase inhibitors favor the trigonal bipyramidal transition state geometries," Coordination Chemistry Reviews, vol.
without a spicule) consisted of euhedral prismatic bipyramidal crystals (Figure 23, right).
Based on the morphology, we have distinguished two groups of zircon grains: (1) euhedral elongated bipyramidal prisms and (2) stubby prisms.
Both the monosubstituted and disubstituted transition states, 2 and 4 respectively, for the ethynyl substitution of fluorine with a lithium counter cation displayed unconventional geometry at the trigonal bipyramidal boron center.
One of the Ni2 + (1) ions is coordinated by two histidine (His) imidazole nitrogens, one aspartic acid (Asp) carbonyl oxygen and a H2O molecule oxygen (or Hydroxyl of H2O dissociation production), formatting square pyramidal or trigonal bipyramidal geometry ,which may be activated water molecules, producing nucleophilic group - hydroxyl ion (OH-); another Ni2 +(2) is coordinated by two histidine imid- azole nitrogen and a weak ligand , forming tetrahedral geometry, which may be the activated center of catalytic substrate activation.
Gray, "Plasmonic interactions and optical forces between au bipyramidal nanoparticle dimers," The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, Vol.
The pigment was accidentally discovered when some manganese compounds came out of a 2,000 degree Fahrenheit oven transformed into a beautiful blue, which researchers later determined was due to an unusual "trigonal bipyramidal coordination" of their molecules that changed when exposed to extreme heat.