Black Death


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Black Death

n.
An outbreak of virulent plague, especially its bubonic form, that killed large numbers of people throughout Europe and much of Asia in the 14th century.

[Ultimately translation of Scandinavian terms for the bubonic plague, such as Swedish (den) svarta döden, (the) black death (possibly in reference to the dark lesions and gangrene caused by bubonic plague, or to the general gloom prevailing during epidemics ) : svart, black + död, death.]

Black Death

n
(Historical Terms) the Black Death a form of bubonic plague pandemic in Europe and Asia during the 14th century, when it killed over 50 million people. See bubonic plague

Black′ Death′


n.
an outbreak of bubonic plague that spread over Europe and Asia in the 14th century and killed an estimated quarter of the population.
[1815–25]

Black Death

A widespread epidemic of bubonic plague that occurred in several outbreaks between 1347 and 1400. It originated in Asia and then swept through Europe, where it killed about a third of the population.

Black Death

The name given to the form of bubonic plague that caused widespread death throughout Europe in the 14th century.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Black Death - the epidemic form of bubonic plague experienced during the Middle Ages when it killed nearly half the people of western EuropeBlack Death - the epidemic form of bubonic plague experienced during the Middle Ages when it killed nearly half the people of western Europe
bubonic plague, glandular plague, pestis bubonica - the most common form of the plague in humans; characterized by chills, prostration, delirium and the formation of buboes in the armpits and groin; does not spread from person to person
Translations
موت أسود
черна смърт
pesta Negra
den sorte død
Beulenpestschwarzer Tod
must surm
musta surma
peste noire
המוות השחור
doba kuge
Kematian Hitam
svarti dauði
peste nera
ペスト
흑사병
juodoji mirtis
melnā nāve
Zwarte Dood
czarna śmierć
peste negra
moartea neagră
mor
črna smrt
crna smrtцрна смрт
digerdöden
kara ölüm
References in classic literature ?
Then came a terrible disease called the Black Death, slaying young and old, rich and poor, until nearly half the people in the land were dead.
prentice to him at Lymington in the year of the Black Death.
Curses on your head, and black death on your heart, you imp
The man who was immune to yellow fever was carried away by cholera; and if he were immune to that, too, the Black Death, which was the bubonic plague, swept him away.
Their groping efforts to better their condition received strong stimulus also from the ravages of the terrible Black Death, a pestilence which, sweeping off at its first visitation, in 1348, at least half the population, and on two later recurrences only smaller proportions, led to a scarcity of laborers and added strength to their demand for commutation of personal services by money-payments and for higher wages.
These were destroyed by their own hands and passed to the dank house of chill Hades, and left no name: terrible though they were, black Death seized them, and they left the bright light of the sun.
Polish national Herba allegedly claimed to be a hitman for the Dark Web crime gang Black Death.
NYT Syndicate It's thought to have killed between 30 and 60 percent of Europe's population, but the Black Death plague may not have been spread by flea-infested rats, Norwegian scientists report.
com/International/wireStory/fact-vies-fantasy-black-death-model-kidnap-case-49116813) Black Death ," a criminal organization that operates on the Dark Web and advertises selling kidnapped women as sex slaves.
Little is known about the Black Death criminal syndicate said to have been behind the model's kidnap.
3 BLACK DEATH (2010) ALMOST as grim as Savage Grace, this downbeat horror flick saw Eddie play a monk in Black Death-era England.
This study of the Black Death in the 14th century in Sweden demonstrates social and ecological change by employing non-written sources of evidence from archaeology and the natural sciences, such as human skeletons, tree rings, isotope data, pollen data, and the ruins of buildings.