buppie

(redirected from Black middle class)
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bup·pie

 (bŭp′ē)
n. Informal
A young black city or suburban resident with a well-paid professional job and an affluent lifestyle.

buppie

(ˈbʌpɪ)
n
(Sociology) informal (sometimes capital) an affluent young Black person
[C20: from B(lack) + (y)uppie]
Translations

buppie

, buppy
References in periodicals archive ?
Both of his poetry collections contain poems that are very critical of what he considered to be the misguided pretensions and aspirations of the black middle class of his time.
In the 1920s, Pullman employees created the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first African-American union with collective bargaining rights, a group that was instrumental in advancing the black middle class.
NEW YORK -- William Greaves, the Emmy-award winning co-host and executive producer of a groundbreaking television news program and a prolific filmmaker whose subjects ranged from Muhammad Ali to the Harlem Renaissance to the black middle class, has died at age 87.
The black middle class was devastated and a have and have-not's dynamic emerged, creating divisions that a community still struggling with issues of equality cannot afford," Taylor says.
As a result of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the black middle class were able to live wherever they wanted and could afford.
Nicholas Nkosi, a manager with Standard Bank, added his voice to the excitement about a new and financially empowered black middle class.
Theodore Venter, a political analyst and lecturer at North-West University, said that one of the legacies of black emancipation has been the emergence of a black middle class that shares the same fears as whites.
Even more telling than the swelling ranks of African Americans among the rich, famous, and powerful is the impressive and continuing growth of the black middle class, with its corresponding increase in income.
Instead, she presents a heartening discussion of a black middle class that refused to flee the city as both black and white middle classes have done elsewhere.
The journal is also expanding its editorial board, to include a new generation of scholars and activists that has emerged amidst the Black Studies revolution and the institutionalizing of black scholarship; the explosion of ethnic, postcolonial, gender and sexuality studies; vast changes in immigration patterns; the end of Apartheid in South Africa; the election of President Barack Obama; and the burgeoning of a black middle class alongside an increasingly criminalized black underclass.
Some specific topics include statistical models for social networks, the sociology of finance, the evolution of the new black middle class, and relations between the generations in immigrant families.
The Gibsons were wealthy landowners in South Carolina who became white in the 1760s, the Spencers were farmers in Appalachia in the 1840s and toed the line between white and black, and the Walls represented the rising black middle class in post-Civil War Washington, D.