Planck's law

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Planck's law

n
(General Physics) physics a law that is the basis of quantum theory, which states that the energy of electromagnetic radiation is confined to indivisible packets (quanta), each of which has an energy equal to the product of the Planck constant and the frequency of the radiation

Planck's law

The principle that lectromagnetic radiation consists of units (quanta or photons).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Planck's law - (physics) the basis of quantum theory; the energy of electromagnetic waves is contained in indivisible quanta that have to be radiated or absorbed as a whole; the magnitude is proportional to frequency where the constant of proportionality is given by Planck's constant
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the derivation of the blackbody function itself was completely independent of the derivation of Kirchhoff's law, since when setting A = 1, one obtains E = e from Kirchhoff.
Additionally, and this was perhaps most troubling, Schuster maintained that the radiative layer was emitting as k F, where F was the blackbody function and k was a wavelength dependent constant which could adopt any value between zero and infinity.
In either the spectral or total mode of measurement, the ideal blackbody functions as a primary standard because the equations of state are known in terms of the underlying physics, and there are no parameters that depend on temperature.