Blackmun

Black·mun

 (blăk′mən), Harry Andrew 1908-1999.
American jurist who was an associate justice of the US Supreme Court (1970-1994).

Black•mun

(ˈblæk mən)

n.
Harry A(ndrew), 1908–99, U.S. jurist: associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1970–94.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are thrilled to be partnering with Los Angeles as our US bid city for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games," USOC chief Scott Blackmun said.
US Olympic Committee chief executive Scott Blackmun and the leader of Boston's 2024 bid, Steve Pagliuca, made the announcement in a joint statement.
Blackmun, chief executive officer of the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), compared graduates at Bentley's 96th undergraduate commencement to a U.
After leading an hourlong Q&A with the leaders of the Boston bid Friday, CEO Scott Blackmun said he naturally wasn't thrilled with recent polling of Boston-area residents by WBUR radio that showed support for hosting the 2024 Games had dipped from 51 to 44 percent between January and February.
UsocA's chief executive, Scott Blackmun, said: "All four cities have presented plans that are part of the long-term visions for their communities.
That will be an important part of the process after we make our selection in January," USOC's chief executive Scott Blackmun added.
Re-elected members: New members: Mrs Tjasa Andree-Prosenc (Slovenia) Dr Abdullah Al Hayyan (Kuwait) Mr Patrick Baumann (Switzerland) Mr Scott Blackmun (USA) Mr John D.
Blackmun informed: "It is our pleasure to inform you that Shihab Aldin Al Riyami has successfully completed the ICECP and the project on the Development of National Volleyball Coaching Education Programme.
consider 2024," USOC chief executive Scott Blackmun said on Friday.
Justice Blackmun to present his support for the Roe v.
In the Strickland conference, according to notes made by Justice Blackmun and Justice Brennan, Chief Justice Burger initially disfavored creating a uniform standard, preferring that the lower courts review each claim of ineffectiveness based on reversible error.
Wade, Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, writing for the majority, cited favourably--eight times--a book by Lawrence Lader entitled Abortion.