blacksmith

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black·smith

 (blăk′smĭth′)
n.
1. One that forges and shapes iron with an anvil and hammer.
2. One that makes, repairs, and fits horseshoes.

[From the color of iron.]

black′smith′ing n.

blacksmith

(ˈblækˌsmɪθ)
n
(Metallurgy) an artisan who works iron with a furnace, anvil, hammer, etc
[C14: see black, smith]

black•smith

(ˈblækˌsmɪθ)

n.
1. a person who makes horseshoes and shoes horses.
2. a person who forges objects of iron.
[1250–1300]
black′smith`ing, n.

Blacksmith

One who works in iron and repairs iron implements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Blacksmith - a smith who forges and shapes iron with a hammer and anvilblacksmith - a smith who forges and shapes iron with a hammer and anvil
farrier, horseshoer - a person who shoes horses
metalworker, smith - someone who works metal (especially by hammering it when it is hot and malleable)
Translations
حَدّاد
kovář
grovsmed
hevosenkengittäjäseppä
kovačkovačica
patkolókovács
járnsmiîur
鍛冶屋
kovač

blacksmith

[ˈblæksmɪθ] Nherrero/a m/f
blacksmith's (forge)herrería f

blacksmith

[ˈblæksmɪθ] nforgeron mblack spot n
(on road)point m noir
(= bad area for sth) → point m noirblack-tie black tie
adj [dinner, function] → en tenue de soirée, habillé(e)
n
to wear black tie → porter un smoking

blacksmith

[ˈblækˌsmɪθ] nfabbro ferraio

black

(blӕk) adjective
1. of the colour in which these words are printed. black paint.
2. without light. a black night; The night was black and starless.
3. dirty. Your hands are black!; black hands from lifting coal.
4. without milk. black coffee.
5. evil. black magic.
6. (often offensive. currently acceptable in the United States, South Africa etc) Negro, of African, West Indian descent.
7. (especially South Africa) coloured; of mixed descent (increasingly used by people of mixed descent to refer to themselves).
noun
1. the colour in which these words are printed. Black and white are opposites.
2. something (eg paint) black in colour. I've used up all the black.
3. (often with capital. often offensive: currently acceptable in the United states, South Africa etc) a Negro; a person of African, West Indian etc descent.
verb
to make black.
ˈblackness noun
ˈblacken verb
1. to make or become black. The sky blackened before the storm.
2. to make to seem bad. She blackened his character.
3. to clean with black polish. He blackened his boots.
black art/magic
magic performed for evil reasons. He tries to practise black magic.
ˈblackbird noun
a dark-coloured bird of the thrush family.
ˈblackboard noun
a dark-coloured board for writing on in chalk (used especially in schools).
black box
a built-in machine for automatic recording of the details of a plane's flight. They found the black box two miles away from the wreckage of the crashed plane.
the Black Death noun
the plague that killed large numbers of people in Europe in the 14th to 18th centuries.
black eye
an eye with bad bruising around it (eg from a punch). George gave me a black eye.
ˈblackhead noun
a small black-topped lump in a pore of the skin, especially of the face.
ˈblacklist noun
a list of people who are out of favour etc.
verb
to put (a person etc) on such a list.
ˈblackmail verb
to obtain money illegally from (a person), usually by threatening to make known something which the victim wants to keep secret.
noun
the act of blackmailing. money got by blackmail.
ˈblackmailer noun
Black Maria (məˈraiə)
a prison van. The policeman took the three suspects to the police station in a Black Maria.
black market
(a place for) the illegal buying and selling, at high prices, of goods that are scarce, rationed etc. coffee on the black market.
black marketeer
a person who sells goods on the black market.
ˈblackout noun
1. a period of darkness produced by putting out all lights. Accidents increase during a blackout.
2. a ban (on news etc). a blackout of news about the coup.
3. a period of unconsciousness. He has had several blackouts during his illness.
4. a brief, temporary loss of memory, as when an actor forgets his/her lines.
5. (also outage) a period of a general power failure.
6. (in the theatre) the putting out of the stage lights at the end of a scene etc.
black sheep
a member of a family or group who is unsatisfactory in some way. My brother is the black sheep of the family.
ˈblacksmith noun
a person who makes and repairs by hand things made of iron. The blacksmith made a new shoe for the horse.
black and blue
badly bruised. After the fight the boy was all black and blue.
black out
to lose consciousness. He blacked out for almost a minute.
in black and white
in writing or print. Would you put that down in black and white?
References in classic literature ?
They were nearly all whalemen; chief mates, and second mates, and third mates, and sea carpenters, and sea coopers, and sea blacksmiths, and harpooneers, and ship keepers; a brown and brawny company, with bosky beards; an unshorn, shaggy set, all wearing monkey jackets for morning gowns.
Well then let me tell them that if these nets, instead of being green cord, were made of the hardest diamonds, or stronger than that wherewith the jealous god of blacksmiths enmeshed Venus and Mars, I would break them as easily as if they were made of rushes or cotton threads.
There are native tanners, shoemakers, weavers, blacksmiths, stonecutters, and other artificers attached to each establishment.
The blacksmiths from a neighboring smithy, hearing the sounds of revelry in the tavern and supposing it to have been broken into, wished to force their way in too and a fight in the porch had resulted.
Now writers are so much better paid than blacksmiths that there must be ever so many more men who would like to write, who - try to write.
The blacksmiths from Barkingham had to break them out; the whole house was found full of iron doors, back staircases , and all that sort of thing, just like the Inquisition.
Nobody would expect two blacksmiths to be violently attracted toward each other merely because they were both blacksmiths.
The inhabitants are chiefly landowners, together with a few shopkeepers and the necessary tradesmen, such as blacksmiths and carpenters, who do nearly all the business for a circuit of fifty miles round.
They were masons, carpenters, joiners, slaters, blacksmiths, and glaziers; and there was work enough to last them for a long time, for had they not their own houses to build when they had finished those for other people?
The men were employed as shoemakers, ropemakers, blacksmiths, tailors, carpenters, and stonecutters; and in building a new prison, which was pretty far advanced towards completion.
The cobbler wrought upon a shoe; the blacksmith hammered his iron, the soldier waved his glittering blade; the lady raised a tiny breeze with her fan; the jolly toper swigged lustily at his bottle; a scholar opened his book with eager thirst for knowledge, and turned his head to and fro along the page; the milkmaid energetically drained her cow; and a miser counted gold into his strong-box,--all at the same turning of a crank.
Moreover, the ship's forge was ordered to be hoisted out of its temporary idleness in the hold; and, to accelerate the affair, the blacksmith was commanded to proceed at once to the forging of whatever iron contrivances might be needed.