Blériot

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Blé·riot

 (blā′rē-ō, blā-ryō′), Louis 1872-1936.
French aviator who was the first to cross the English Channel by airplane (1909).

Blériot

(French blerjo)
n
(Biography) Louis (lwi). 1872–1936, French aviator and aeronautical engineer: made the first flight across the English Channel (1909)

Blé•riot

(ˈblɛər iˌoʊ)

n.
Louis, 1872–1936, French aviator, pioneer aeronautical engineer, and inventor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bleriot - French aviator who in 1909 made the first flight across the English Channel (1872-1936)Bleriot - French aviator who in 1909 made the first flight across the English Channel (1872-1936)
References in classic literature ?
That would be Johnny Oates going out in his Bleriot," some one remarked.
Contract notice for Replacement of SSI Lyce Louis Bleriot in Trappes (78)
1913: Adolphe Pegond baled out from a Bleriot airplane 700 feet above Buc in France.
1909: Louis Bleriot became the first man to fly across the Channel, in his three-cylinder monoplane.
1909: Louis Bleriot became the first man to fly across the Channel, flying his three-cylinder monoplane from near Calais to Northfall Meadow near Dover Castle.
THE home of an aviation pioneer dubbed the Welsh Louis Bleriot is coming up for auction.
During its flybys of the planet, Cassini recently captured an image of the biggest one of these propellers, linked to an especially large "moonlet" called Bleriot, named after the first aviator to fly over the English Channel more than 100 years ago.
Its neighbour in the museum, the Bleriot XI, is almost identical to the aircraft Louis Bleriot flew across the English Channel in 1909.
First observed by Cassini in 2005 Bleriot has been repeatedly revisited, most recently in this observation from Nov.
1909: Louis Bleriot became the first man to fly an aeroplane across the Channel, in his three-cylinder monoplane from near Calais to Northfall Meadow near Dover Castle.
had given up his Voisin biplane for a monoplane made by Louis Bleriot.
One of his last engagements was at the Barbican Cup meeting, two weeks after the Waterloo, when the aerial there was continued by Bleriot, who divided the consolatory Purse.