blind spot

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blind spot

n.
1. Anatomy The small, circular, optically insensitive region in the retina where fibers of the optic nerve emerge from the eyeball. It has no rods or cones. Also called optic disk.
2. An area that one cannot see because of an obstruction.
3. An area where radio reception is weak or nonexistent.
4. A subject about which one is markedly ignorant or prejudiced: His niece is his blind spot; in his eyes, she can do no wrong.

blind spot

n
1. (Physiology) a small oval-shaped area of the retina in which vision is not experienced. It marks the nonphotosensitive site of entrance into the eyeball of the optic nerve. See optic disc
2. a place or area, as in an auditorium or part of a road, where vision is completely or partially obscured or hearing is difficult or impossible
3. a subject about which a person is ignorant or prejudiced, or an occupation in which he or she is inefficient
4. (Broadcasting) a location within the normal range of a radio transmitter with weak reception

blind′ spot`


n.
1. a small area of the retina, where it continues to the optic nerve, that is insensitive to light.
2. an area about which one is uninformed or unappreciative.
[1860–65]

blind spot

(blīnd)
A point on the retina that is not sensitive to light. The optic nerve attaches to the retina at this point.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blind spot - a subject about which you are ignorant or prejudiced and fail to exercise good judgment; "golf is one of his blind spots and he's proud of it"
matter, topic, issue, subject - some situation or event that is thought about; "he kept drifting off the topic"; "he had been thinking about the subject for several years"; "it is a matter for the police"
2.blind spot - the point where the optic nerve enters the retinablind spot - the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light
retina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeball; it is continuous with the optic nerve
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
Translations
بُقْعَةٌ عَمْياءقَضِيَّةٌ عَمْياء مَفْهومَه
mezeranepřehledné/slepé místo
blind vinkelblindt punkthul
angle mortpoint aveugle
fehér foltvakfolt
blindur blettur, staîur sem sést ekki
nemať porozumenieneprehľadné miesto
aklın ermediği şeyanlaşılamayan şeykör nokta

blind spot

n (Anat) → punto cieco (Aut) → angolo in cui manca la visibilità (fig) → punto debole

blind

(blaind) adjective
1. not able to see. a blind man.
2. (with to) unable to notice. She is blind to his faults.
3. hiding what is beyond. a blind corner.
4. of or for blind people. a blind school.
noun
1. (often in plural) a screen to prevent light coming through a window etc. The sunlight is too bright – pull down the blinds!
2. something intended to mislead or deceive. He did that as a blind.
verb
to make blind. He was blinded in the war.
ˈblinding adjective
1. tending to make blind. a blinding light.
2. sudden. He realized, in a blinding flash, that she was the murderer.
ˈblindly adverb
ˈblindness noun
blind alley
a situation without any way out. This is a blind alley of a job.
ˈblindfold noun
a piece of cloth etc put over the eyes to prevent someone from seeing. The kidnappers put a blindfold over the child's eyes.
verb
to put a blindfold on (some person or animal).
adjective, adverb
with the eyes covered by a cloth etc. She came blindfold into the room.
blind spot
1. any matter about which one always shows lack of understanding. She seems to have a blind spot about physics.
2. an area which is impossible or difficult to see due to an obstruction.
the blind leading the blind
one inexperienced or incompetent person telling another about something. My teaching you about politics will be a case of the blind leading the blind.

blind spot

n escotoma m (form), área de ceguera en el campo visual; (physiological) punto ciego
References in classic literature ?
There's a kind of blind spot," she said, touching her forehead, "there.
That's his third," whispered Raffles, "but it's the first I've seen distinctly, for he waited for the blind spot before the dawn.
9, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- A Florida businessman has received a groundbreaking patent for a side-view mirror control system with no blind spots.
Similarly, in Before Happiness, I wrote that we all have mental blind spots that distort our perspective about aspects of our lives or work, impairing our decision-making and judgment.
The 80-year-old has been diagnosed with dry and wet macular degeneration - the first causes blurred vision and the latter can lead to blind spots.
We have our patented bbs-tek White Sound reversing alarms that make the source of danger more easily beatable than equivalent tonal alarms; new Backsense radar obstacle detection to alert the driver; and Backeye 360 Systems that eliminate blind spots by giving a 'bird's-eye view' all around the machine in a single image.
Mr Bennion, a Lib Dem transport spokesman, has tabled amendments to European Union directives which would require HGV makers to build cabs with better sightlines and reduced blind spots.
This is encouraging, and consistent with our previous research in which mature drivers identified turning their head to see blind spots as a challenging aspect of driving.
It concludes that there is not currently enough evidence to require HGVs to be mandatorily fitted with new technology to eradicate blind spots.
FORD'S revamped S-Max and Galaxy people carriers have just gone on sale - complete with radar technology to detect vehicles hidden in rearward blind spots.
For that purpose, say the researchers, they took advantage of the blind spots that occur naturally in our eyes where the optic nerve exits the retina, reports New Scientist magazine.
Van Hecke writes that mental blind spots account for most situations people ordinarily label as stupid mistakes.