blood type

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blood type

blood type

n
(Medicine) another name for blood group

blood′ group`


n.
any of various classes into which human blood can be divided according to immunological compatibility based on the presence or absence of specific antigens on red blood cells. Also called blood type. Compare ABO system, Rh factor.
[1915–20]

blood type

Any of the four main types into which human blood is divided: A, B, AB, and O. Blood types are based on the presence or absence of certain substances, called antigens, on red blood cells. Also called blood group.
Did You Know? Blood transfusions used to be a doctor's treatment of last resort, since they often caused people to get sick and die. But in the 1890s, a scientist named Karl Landsteiner began to solve the transfusion puzzle. He found that all human red blood cells belonged to one of four groups, or blood types, which he named A, B, AB, and O. The types refer to substances, called antigens, found on the surface of these cells. Antibodies circulating in a person's blood normally recognize the antigens in that same person's blood cells and don't react with them. However, if a person with one blood type is given blood of another type, the antibodies bind to the foreign antigens, causing clumping of the blood and other serious reactions. Thus the key to the transfusion puzzle is to give a person blood that has matching antigens. Today, hospitals always test a blood sample before a transfusion to make sure there is a good match.

blood type

Any of various types of blood (notably A, B, AB, O, Rh-positive, Rh-negative) named for the antigen(s) they do or do not contain. Mismatched blood transfusions cause adverse reactions in recipients.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blood type - human blood cells (usually just the red blood cells) that have the same antigensblood type - human blood cells (usually just the red blood cells) that have the same antigens
blood - the fluid (red in vertebrates) that is pumped through the body by the heart and contains plasma, blood cells, and platelets; "blood carries oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and carries away waste products"; "the ancients believed that blood was the seat of the emotions"
group A, type A, A - the blood group whose red cells carry the A antigen
group B, type B, B - the blood group whose red cells carry the B antigen
group AB, type AB, AB - the blood group whose red cells carry both the A and B antigens
group O, type O, O - the blood group whose red cells carry neither the A nor B antigens; "people with type O blood are universal donors"
Rh positive, Rh-positive blood type - the blood group (approximately 85% of people) whose red cells have the Rh factor (Rh antigen)
Rh negative, Rh-negative blood, Rh-negative blood type - the blood group whose red cells lack the Rh factor (Rh antigen)
Translations
krevní skupina
blodtype
veriryhmä
vércsoport
krvna skupina

blood type

ngruppo sanguigno
References in periodicals archive ?
Those with A, B, or AB blood types had smaller gray matter volumes in temporal and limbic regions of the brain, including the left hippocampus--the earliest part of the brain damaged by Alzheimer's disease.
the same blood group, it's vital that NHS Blood and Transplant has a constant supply of all blood types.
3% GROUP AB 48% GROUP O In order to have enough blood to meet every patient's needs, it's important to have the right mix of blood types among those who donate.
The Canadian researchers have created an enzyme that could potentially pave the way for changing blood types.
Donors of all blood types are needed, especially those with O negative, A negative and B negative.
TEHRAN (FNA)- People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types.
Campaigns encourage those with rare blood types to give, as well as relatives of those with rare blood types.
Tom Vierhile, Innovation Insights Director for Datamonitor Consumer, said: "There may be little or no scientific basis for creating foods that are compatible with a person's blood type, but the concept may resonate as there is some belief that blood types themselves may have been influenced by one's evolutionary background and exposure to certain food types.
Wood and Dore exposed pairs of human volunteers with different blood types to 20 female mosquitoes (males do not suck blood).
In her engaging study, Boaz presents her findings through a focus on serology, namely the study of blood types (A, B, O, etc.
Blood types found in people today evolved at least 20 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and other primates, new research suggests.