haemorrhage

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haemorrhage

(ˈhɛmərɪdʒ) or

hemorrhage

n
1. (Pathology) profuse bleeding from ruptured blood vessels
2. a steady or severe loss or depletion of resources, staff, etc
vb
3. (Pathology) (intr) to bleed profusely
4. (tr) to undergo a steady or severe loss or depletion of (resources, staff, etc)
[C17: from Latin haemorrhagia; see haemo-, -rrhagia]
haemorrhagic, hemorrhagic adj

haemorrhage


Past participle: haemorrhaged
Gerund: haemorrhaging

Imperative
haemorrhage
haemorrhage
Present
I haemorrhage
you haemorrhage
he/she/it haemorrhages
we haemorrhage
you haemorrhage
they haemorrhage
Preterite
I haemorrhaged
you haemorrhaged
he/she/it haemorrhaged
we haemorrhaged
you haemorrhaged
they haemorrhaged
Present Continuous
I am haemorrhaging
you are haemorrhaging
he/she/it is haemorrhaging
we are haemorrhaging
you are haemorrhaging
they are haemorrhaging
Present Perfect
I have haemorrhaged
you have haemorrhaged
he/she/it has haemorrhaged
we have haemorrhaged
you have haemorrhaged
they have haemorrhaged
Past Continuous
I was haemorrhaging
you were haemorrhaging
he/she/it was haemorrhaging
we were haemorrhaging
you were haemorrhaging
they were haemorrhaging
Past Perfect
I had haemorrhaged
you had haemorrhaged
he/she/it had haemorrhaged
we had haemorrhaged
you had haemorrhaged
they had haemorrhaged
Future
I will haemorrhage
you will haemorrhage
he/she/it will haemorrhage
we will haemorrhage
you will haemorrhage
they will haemorrhage
Future Perfect
I will have haemorrhaged
you will have haemorrhaged
he/she/it will have haemorrhaged
we will have haemorrhaged
you will have haemorrhaged
they will have haemorrhaged
Future Continuous
I will be haemorrhaging
you will be haemorrhaging
he/she/it will be haemorrhaging
we will be haemorrhaging
you will be haemorrhaging
they will be haemorrhaging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been haemorrhaging
you have been haemorrhaging
he/she/it has been haemorrhaging
we have been haemorrhaging
you have been haemorrhaging
they have been haemorrhaging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been haemorrhaging
you will have been haemorrhaging
he/she/it will have been haemorrhaging
we will have been haemorrhaging
you will have been haemorrhaging
they will have been haemorrhaging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been haemorrhaging
you had been haemorrhaging
he/she/it had been haemorrhaging
we had been haemorrhaging
you had been haemorrhaging
they had been haemorrhaging
Conditional
I would haemorrhage
you would haemorrhage
he/she/it would haemorrhage
we would haemorrhage
you would haemorrhage
they would haemorrhage
Past Conditional
I would have haemorrhaged
you would have haemorrhaged
he/she/it would have haemorrhaged
we would have haemorrhaged
you would have haemorrhaged
they would have haemorrhaged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haemorrhage - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vesselhaemorrhage - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vessel
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
haemorrhagic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke - stroke caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain
cerebral hemorrhage - bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel in the brain
blood extravasation - the leakage of blood from a vessel into tissues surrounding it; can occur in injuries or burns or allergic reactions
hyphema - bleeding into the interior chamber of the eye
metrorrhagia - bleeding from the uterus that is not due to menstruation; usually indicative of disease (as cervical cancer)
epistaxis, nosebleed - bleeding from the nose
ulemorrhagia - bleeding of the gums

haemorrhage

noun
1. drain, outpouring, rapid loss The move would stem the haemorrhage of talent from the area.
verb
1. drain, bleed, flow rapidly cash was haemorrhaging from the conglomerate
Translations
نَزْف، نَزيف
krvácení
indre blødning
vérzés
blæîing
kraujavimas
asinsizplūdums
krvácanie
kanama

haemorrhage

hemorrhage (US) [ˈhemərɪdz]
A. Nhemorragia f

haemorrhage

[ˈhɛmərɪdʒ] hemorrhage (US)
nhémorragie f
to have a haemorrhage → faire une hémorragie brain haemorrhage
vifaire une hémorragie

haemorrhage

, (US) hemorrhage
nBlutung f, → Hämorrhagie f (spec); (fig, of talent, young people etc) → Exodus m, → Abwanderung f
vibluten

haemorrhage

hemorrhage (Am) [ˈhɛmərɪdʒ]
1. nemorragia

haemorrhage

(American) hemorrhage (ˈheməridʒ) noun
bleeding in large amounts, from damaged blood-vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical response was defined as menstrual blood loss volume of less than 80 mL during month six and a 50% or greater reduction in menstrual blood loss volume from baseline to month six.
Varying figures from <500 ml to >1000 ml blood loss have been reported by different authors in women undergoing CS.
Syntocinon, Methergine, Misoprostol and Prostaglandin (PGF2a) have been used in different studies, claiming advantages, efficacy and side effects of one or the other with regards to reduction of blood loss, shortening of duration of 3rd stage of labour, reduction in the incidence of PPH and side effects.
The study met its primary endpoint with the product indicating a marked decrease in menstrual blood loss from Week six to Week 12 as evaluated by a patient-reported outcome (p < 0.
SAN ANTONIO -- In new guidelines, the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons suggested uterine preservation, when not contraindicated, for most pelvic organ prolapse repairs to decrease mesh erosion, operating room time, and blood loss.
Sometimes blood loss is so inconsequential we barely notice - a nick while shaving, the prick of a finger - but what about the times when blood loss is so great that our bodies begin to suffer serious consequences?
Underestimation of blood loss at delivery time is one the reasons of the delayed diagnosis of blood loss.
Gynecologists often use vasopressin to reduce surgical blood loss.
The total transfusion volumes and transfusion volume per 1 g of blood loss were determined for each group.
This volume is intended as a reference for those clinicians whose patients, in addition to experiencing the consequences of their underlying disease, are often at risk for anemia, coagulation disorders, and/or major blood loss.
The following major causes have been identified among the cohort of the 2011-2013 deaths ascribed to haemorrhage:[3] (i) inadequate utilisation of uterotonic agents; (ii) poor recognition of the severity of the blood loss causing hypovolaemia; (iii) inadequate surgical skill; and (iv) delays in relaparotomy and/or referral in case of post-CS bleeding.