blowhole

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blow·hole

 (blō′hōl′)
n.
1. An opening or one of a pair of openings for breathing, located on the top of the head of cetaceans, such as whales and dolphins. The blowhole is opened by muscles upon surfacing and closed by the pressure of water upon diving.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals, such as dolphins, come to breathe.
3. A vent to permit the escape of air or other gas.

blowhole

(ˈbləʊˌhəʊl)
n
1. (Zoology) the nostril, paired or single, of whales, situated far back on the skull
2. (Zoology) a hole in ice through which whales, seals, etc, breathe
3. (Building)
a. a vent for air or gas, esp to release fumes from a tunnel, passage, etc
b. NZ a hole emitting gas or steam in a volcanic region
4. (Metallurgy) a bubble-like defect in an ingot resulting from gas being trapped during solidification
5. (Geological Science) geology a hole in a cliff top leading to a sea cave through which air is forced by the action of the sea

blow•hole

(ˈbloʊˌhoʊl)

n.
1. either of two nostrils or spiracles, or a single one, at the top of the head in whales and dolphins, through which they breathe.
2. a hole in the ice to which whales or seals come to breathe.
3. a defect in metal caused by the escape of gas.
[1685–95]

blow·hole

(blō′hōl′)
1. A hole or one of a pair of holes used for breathing and located on top of the head of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals come to breathe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skullblowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skull
cetacean, cetacean mammal, blower - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whales; dolphins; porpoises; narwhals
spiracle - a breathing orifice
2.blowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or airblowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or air
air duct, air passage, airway - a duct that provides ventilation (as in mines)
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
smoke hole - a vent (as in a roof) for smoke to escape
Translations
مَنْفَذُ هَواء
nozdryvětrací/dýchací otvor
åndehul
szelelõlyuk
öndunarop; blástursop
hava deliğinefeslik

blowhole

[ˈbləʊhəʊl] N
1. [of whale] → orificio m nasal
2. (in ice) → brecha f, orificio m (para respirar)

blowhole

[ˈbləʊˌhəʊl] n (Geol) → sfiatatoio

blow2

(bləu) past tense blew (blu) : past participle blown verb
1. (of a current of air) to be moving. The wind blew more strongly.
2. (of eg wind) to cause (something) to move in a given way. The explosion blew off the lid.
3. to be moved by the wind etc. The door must have blown shut.
4. to drive air (upon or into). Please blow into this tube!
5. to make a sound by means of (a musical instrument etc). He blew the horn loudly.
ˈblowhole noun
a breathing-hole (through the ice for seals etc) or a nostril (especially on the head of a whale etc).
ˈblow-lamp, ˈblow-torch noun
a lamp for aiming a very hot flame at a particular spot. The painter burned off the old paint with a blow-lamp.
ˈblowout noun
1. the bursting of a car tyre. That's the second blowout I've had with this car.
2. (on eg an oil rig) a violent escape of gas etc.
ˈblowpipe noun
a tube from which a dart (often poisonous) is blown.
blow one's top
to become very angry. She blew her top when he arrived home late.
blow out
to extinguish or put out (a flame etc) by blowing. The wind blew out the candle; The child blew out the match.
blow over
to pass and become forgotten. The trouble will soon blow over.
blow up
1. to break into pieces, or be broken into pieces, by an explosion. The bridge blew up / was blown up.
2. to fill with air or a gas. He blew up the balloon.
3. to lose one's temper. If he says that again I'll blow up.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenby RNLI crew member Ben James said: "Whilst searching, they located the dog in a blow hole behind a cave that was inaccessible by sea.
But on a closer inspection I could see the blow hole on top of his head and realised it was a dolphin.
A hole created from pressure build-up inside the mold escaping through the parting line, during the heating cycle, may blow out through the molten plastic through the mold parting line, creating a blow hole without an internal bubble.
Research showed Noc varied the pressure in the nasal cavities beneath his blow hole to produce sounds very different from the clicks and whistles whales usually make.
In between, you have hundreds of eyes scanning the horizon, looking for a burst of air from the blow hole (looks like a puff of smoke).
They battled a five-foot swell as they tried to keep the whale's blow hole clear so it could breathe.
Christine Paice has created the story of the creation of the Kiama Blow Hole on the southern New South Wales coast.
The sense of awe at our hero eventually emerging, gasping for breath from a blow hole, might have been greater had Austin's cameraman not also, miraculously elected to train his lens on that same precise opening.
50) but Jeremy Noseda's Blow Hole is taken to spoil the party.
Blow Hole runs in his first handicap today at Kempton (2.
The blow hole phenomena is far more prevalent in leadfree processing than in tin-lead.
came the response as she blew a raspberry through her blow hole.