Stephen Decatur

(redirected from Blue Lights)
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Noun1.Stephen Decatur - United States naval officer remembered for his heroic deeds (1779-1820)Stephen Decatur - United States naval officer remembered for his heroic deeds (1779-1820)
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You have more than a hundred miles to go before you get to Finland; there the Snow Queen has her country-house, and burns blue lights every evening.
Well, that's mostly because they don't like to go where a man's been murdered, anyway -- but nothing's ever been seen around that house except in the night -- just some blue lights slipping by the windows -- no regular ghosts.
Fireworks, Fourth of July, Kingdom Come, blue lights, sky-rockets, an' hell fire--just like that.
The boat soon shoved off, with a lantern and sundry blue lights on board; and in less than an hour returned; the officer in command bringing with him a tolerably tall young tree, which he had plucked up by the roots, to satisfy certain distrustful passengers whose minds misgave them that they were to be imposed upon and shipwrecked, and who would on no other terms believe that he had been ashore, or had done anything but fraudulently row a little way into the mist, specially to deceive them and compass their deaths.
They were a hold ruined castle on a 'ill near by, hand at midnight they used to see pale blue lights through the windows an 'ear--"
She did draw him up, but when he came near the edge, she stretched down her hand and wanted to take the blue light away from him.
The Blue Light Drug Store is downtown, between the Bowery and First Avenue, where the distance between the two streets is the shortest.
I want the captain," he shouted, then gave it up, making a dash at the companion where a blue light was kept, resolved to act for himself.
There was a hiss from its wave-splashed deck, and a rocket with a blue light flashed up into the sky.
Its walls of pure and solid ice emitted a soft and rich blue light that produced a lovely effect, and suggested enchanted caves, and that sort of thing.
The blue light, through deterioration or damage, flickered out.
Cassandra was impressed again by Katharine's maturity; and, as she enveloped herself in the blue dress which filled almost the whole of the long looking-glass with blue light and made it the frame of a picture, holding not only the slightly moving effigy of the beautiful woman, but shapes and colors of objects reflected from the background, Cassandra thought that no sight had ever been quite so romantic.