Boche


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Related to Boche: Bosch

Boche

also boche  (bŏsh, bôsh)
n. Offensive Slang
A German, especially a German soldier in World War I or World War II.

[French, alteration of Alboche, blend of Allemand, German; see allemande, and French dialectal caboche, cabbage, blockhead; see cabbage.]

Boche

(bɒʃ)
(esp in World Wars I and II) n
1. a German, esp a German soldier
2. the Boche (usually functioning as plural) Germans collectively, esp German soldiers regarded as the enemy
[C20: from French, probably shortened from alboche German, from allemand German + caboche pate]

Boche

(bɒʃ, bɔʃ)

n., pl. Boche, Boches (bosh, bôsh).
usage: This term dates back to World War I and was also used in World War II, but it appears today only in historical contexts. It is used with disparaging intent and is perceived as highly insulting.
n.
(sometimes l.c.) Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive. (a contemptuous term used to refer to a German, esp. a German soldier in World War I and II.)
[1910–15; < French, aph. variant of alboche German]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Boche - offensive term for a person of German descent
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
German - a person of German nationality
Translations

Boche

[bɒʃ]
A. ADJ (pej) → alemán, tudesco
B. N (pej) → boche m, alemán m
the Bochelos alemanes

Boche

n (pej inf)Boche m
References in classic literature ?
It was the second time he had spoken in three days and perhaps his very silence, ominous in itself, had done more to arouse terror in the breast of the Boche than even the spear point, ever ready as it always was.
I hastily pushed the girl down the companionway leading to the engine-room, and then I raised my pistol and fired my first shot at a boche.
My boche was bearing me toward the side of the submarine against which the tug was still pounding.
At first the boches didn't seem to grasp his intention.
I sprang from the pilot-house and followed, not to be left out in the cold when it came to strafing the boches.
Immediately I was put in command, and the first thing I did was to go below with Olson and inspect the craft thoroughly for hidden boches and damaged machinery.
Emil Abramian, MD PA Janette Abramowitz MA Gaurav Aggarwal, MD IN Simon Ahtaridis, MD MA Samir Akach, MD, FACP PA Usman Akhtar, MD NE Fahd Algurashi, MD, MBA CN Ahmad Almai, MD NY Nayef Alonazi, MD CN Mariette Amadi, MD NJ Abigail Annan, MD IN Jeffrey Ayers, DO OH Daniel Baer, MD TX Richard Bankowitz, MD, MBA DC Mark Becker, MD TX Dante Beretta, MD MN Liya Beyderman, MD NJ Abid Bhat, MD KS Benoit Blondeau, MD, MBA MO Steven Blumer, MD PA Benjamin Boche, DO CA Gregory Borah, MD, DMD NJ Lindsay Botsford, MD, MBA TX Edward Bottei, MD IA Gary Brandt, MD OR Paul Braunstein Jr.
Warm thanks to Elisa Boche, Stephane Jaillet, Lara Lamb, Jacqueline Matthews, Magen O'Farrell, Benjamin Sadier, Chris Urwin and Brit Wilson for fieldwork; the Ministere de la Cukure (France), Monash University, the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPaC) Indigenous Heritage Program, the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant and QEII Fellowship (to BD) DPDP0877782 and Linkage Grant LPl10200927, and the EDYTEM laboratories of the Universite de Savoie (France) for continued support and funding.
We squeeze through our own wire without mishap, except that I succeeded in kicking a tin, but the noise did not seem to disturb the Boche, so after an interval we went on.
Eternal coward, I unholstered my sidearm, rallied the other cowards around me, and together we beat the Boche raiding party off" our emplacements and back across the No Man's Land.
Half an hour, sometimes once, sometimes three times a day, in deadly silence with the geophone to your ears, wondering whether the sound you heard was the Boche working silently or your own heart beating.
36) Translation: "Grenades had become gas lamps; unexploded shells served as standing lamps; des boites de singe [note: translation unclear--likely a small box of some type] were turned into mobiles; boche overcoats were made into alcove curtains, gun barrels into chimney grates and bayonet scabbards into wind instruments.