Boland


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Boland

(ˈbʊəlant)
n
(Placename) an area of high altitude in S South Africa
References in periodicals archive ?
Boland in one breath condemns the Irish literary tradition for its imposition of exile on its women practitioners by subtly requiring them to devalue their own experience as fit subject for poetry and become 'honorary male poet[s]', (46) and on the other hand values that tradition for its recognition of exile, its 'response [.
According to Boland, other researchers have printed arrays of proteins and DNA, but never before have ink jets been used to print living cells.
W ILLIE BOLAND, Cardiff City's official Player of the Year, doesn't give many interviews so he can hardly be accused of making brash statements.
Boland of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill report the results in the Oct.
3, Bishop Raymond Boland of Kansas City, said both church and state seek similar goals in areas like education, social services and health care and "we have much to learn from each other.
Since then, says Element 14 founder and CEO, Stan Boland, the company has worked with investment banker Morgan Stanley to build a new business plan aimed at exploiting the market for power efficient but fast DSPs in a market that analysts estimate is growing at between 30% and 40% compound per year, and which they predict will outstrip the larger embedded system space by 2001.
Boland opens his book with the diagnosis that although economic methodology has seen a renaissance since the 1980s, most of the resulting academic output is restricted to 'methodology for methodology's sake.
If Irish women have moved, in a very short space of time, from being the objects to becoming the authors of poems, as Boland puts it, she herself has been one of the most significant moving forces in this massive, disruptive change.
Introducing Eavan Boland (1981), her first volume of verse published outside Ireland, reprinted both The War Horse (1975), with its controlled, conventionally styled poems about suburban life and political tension, and In Her Own Image (1980), featuring terse poetic narratives about women.
For her part, Boland argues that in the past twenty years, Irish women have advanced from being anonymous mute witnesses in the belly of a male-created "mother" Ireland to being authors of literature.
The "lies" of the subtitle are a set of propositions, perpetrated variously by critics or defenders of neoclassicism, which Boland regards as erroneous: that the assumption of maximization is a tautology, that models of imperfect competition can be constructed by relaxing the assumption of price-taking behavior, and so on.