Bollandist


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Bollandist

any of the editors of the Acta Sanctorum, a critical and official hagiology begun by the Jesuits in the 17th century.
See also: Saints
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9) The numbers involved can be gleaned from the Bollandist publications.
10) See the earliest extant biography of Fisher, attributed to Richard Hall (+1604) and edited in English and Latin by the Bollandist Francois Van Ortroy under the title Vie du bienheureux martyr Jean Fisher, cardinal, eveque de Rochester, in Analecta Bollandiana 10 (1891) 121-365 and 12 (1893) 97-287, here [section]7 in 10:208.
Christian scholars, especially those of the Bollandist and Maurist congregations, adopted the philological approach to the study of religious texts, historicizing them much like Asian evidential scholars later did with Confucian Classics.
Other medieval hagiography indexes are available through the Bollandist Society (http://www.
In the two Bollandist catalogues (BHL and Fros' Supplement) the number of Latin texts reaches the total of 13,523, and the sum of a vernacular list would not be small.
Collins ends by casting a brief glance at the hagiography of the post-Reformation period, highlighting in particular its polemical functions and the philological precision and documentary thoroughness that characterized the Bollandist enterprise.
This view became so generalized that in the eighteenth century the French Bollandist monks, feeding on Philip II's black legend, disparagingly called the Escorial library a monumental "bibliotaph," a reliquary for books, a "great tomb of books where manuscripts rot away like corpses": Bouza, 1988, 81 (also in Bouza, 1998, 168).
This Volume contains three lectures given by the great Bollandist, Hippolyte Delehaye, to the College de France in 1935, that have recently turned up among his papers.
Although much of the story of Rhipsime and the nuns is purely legendary, since the study of the Bollandist Paul Peeters, many scholars take seriously the possibility that a martyrdom occurred in Valarshapat around 312, not during the reign of Diocletian but in the context of the renewed persecution of Maximinus Daia, who actually went to Armenia and enacted harsher measures against Christians than those of his predecessors.
The first two of the volumes under review are natural extensions of his impressive Hippolyte Delehaye (2000): the third reaches back into an earlier period of Bollandist production.
Important later sources were the Bollandist Acta Sanctorum (1643-) and the history of the order compiled by the Franciscan Luke Wadding beginning in 1625.