Bolshevik

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Related to Bolsheviks: Mensheviks, Bolshevik Revolution

Bol·she·vik

 (bōl′shə-vĭk′, bŏl′-)
n. pl. Bol·she·viks or Bol·she·vi·ki (-vē′kē)
1.
a. A member of the left-wing majority group of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party that adopted Lenin's theses on party organization in 1903.
b. A member of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party that seized power in that country in November 1917.
c. A member of a Marxist-Leninist party or a supporter of one; a Communist.
2. often bolshevik An extreme radical: a literary bolshevik. In all senses also called Bolshevist.

[Russian Bol'shevik, from bol'she, comparative of bol'shoĭ, large; see bel- in Indo-European roots.]

Bol′she·vik′ adj.
Word History: The word Bolshevik derives from the Russian word bol'she, "bigger, more," the comparative form of bol'shoĭ, "big." In Russian, the plural Bol'sheviki was the name given to the majority faction at the Second Congress of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party in 1903. The smaller faction was known as Men'sheviki, from men'she, "less, smaller," the comparative of malyĭ, "little, few." The Bol'sheviki, who sided with Lenin in the split that followed the Congress, subsequently became the Russian Communist Party. In 1952 the word Bol'shevik was dropped as an official term in the Soviet Union, but it had long since passed into other languages, including English.

Bolshevik

(ˈbɒlʃɪvɪk)
n, pl -viks or -viki (-ˈviːkɪ)
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a Russian Communist. Compare Menshevik
2. (Historical Terms) any Communist
3. (often not capital) jocular derogatory any political radical, esp a revolutionary
[C20: from Russian Bol'shevik majority, from bol'shoi great; from the fact that this group formed a majority of the Russian Social Democratic Party in 1903]
ˈBolsheˌvism n
ˈBolshevist adj, n
ˌBolsheˈvistic adj

Bol•she•vik

(ˈboʊl ʃə vɪk, -ˌvik, ˈbɒl-)

n., pl. -viks, -vik•i (-ˌvɪk i, -ˌvi ki)
1.
a. a member of the radical majority wing of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers' Party, 1903–17, advocating abrupt, forceful seizure of power by the proletariat.
b. (after 1918) a member of the Russian Communist Party.
2. a member of any Communist Party.
3. (often l.c.) Older Use: Disparaging. a political radical or revolutionary.
[1915–20; < Russian bol'shevík, derivative of ból'sh(iĭ) larger, greater]
Bol′she•vism (-ˌvɪz əm) n.
Bol′she•vist, n., adj.
Bol`she•vis′tic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bolshevik - emotionally charged terms used to refer to extreme radicals or revolutionariesBolshevik - emotionally charged terms used to refer to extreme radicals or revolutionaries
radical - a person who has radical ideas or opinions
2.Bolshevik - a Russian member of the left-wing majority group that followed Lenin and eventually became the Russian communist partyBolshevik - a Russian member of the left-wing majority group that followed Lenin and eventually became the Russian communist party
commie, communist - a socialist who advocates communism
Adj.1.Bolshevik - of or relating to Bolshevism; "Bolshevik Revolution"
Translations

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃəvɪk]
A. ADJbolchevique
B. Nbolchevique mf

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃɪvɪk]
adj [revolution, party, regime] → bolchevique
n (= person) → Bolchevik mf

Bolshevik

nBolschewik m

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃəvɪk] adj & nbolscevico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas the Nazis lashed out at external enemies, most of all the Jews, the Bolsheviks attacked the enemy within, the self that refused to adhere completely to the godlike thinking of Lenin or Stalin.
To begin, let us note that the Bolsheviks who led the 'October Revolution' never saw it as a crucial event in just Russian history.
But he then went on to describe the persecution of liberal religious leaders who finally had the space to preach, targeted because the Bolsheviks believed they were "a possible rival to the Communist program.
Later, these same ideas would be admired by and implemented by the Bolsheviks.
Summary: From St Petersburg to Santiago, Kolkata to Havana, the Bolsheviks shook the intelligentsia and the commoner alike like never before
This reference guide on the Russian Revolution of 1917 contains essays and primary documents on the 1905 and 1917 revolutions and the Russian Civil War, and encyclopedia entries on key events and figures, to connect the events of 1905 to 1917, the impact of World War I, the Provisional Government, the Bolsheviks, and the anti-Bolshevik forces that fought in the Russian Civil War.
Like most Old Bolsheviks, Shlyapnikov was devoted to Lenin and respectful of his intellect, his learning, and his dedication to international revolution, but he was occasionally critical of his tactics (his factionalist methods of struggle, for example) and policies (his advocacy of national self-determination that ran against Shlyapnikov's conviction that all workers had common interests).
With surprisingly little resistance, the demonstrators took the Winter Palace, the czar abdicated, and a provisional government was fashioned from a panoply of political parties, including socialists previously aligned with the Bolsheviks.
The Bolsheviks also make subtle offers and attempts to gain Arthur's assistance for their cause.
The first group, named SYREN, was to take over security of Murmansk and help push back the advancing Bolsheviks.
These all shed new light on the brutal atrocities of Kolchak Lieutenants Gregori Semenov, Igor Kalmikov, Boris Annenkov, Pavel Ivanov-Rinov, and Sergei Rozanov, whose "White Terror" had no counterpart from the Bolsheviks because Lenin and Trotsky were concentrating their attention on European Russia.