Bolshevik

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Related to Bolsheviks: Mensheviks, Bolshevik Revolution

Bol·she·vik

 (bōl′shə-vĭk′, bŏl′-)
n. pl. Bol·she·viks or Bol·she·vi·ki (-vē′kē)
1.
a. A member of the left-wing majority group of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party that adopted Lenin's theses on party organization in 1903.
b. A member of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party that seized power in that country in November 1917.
c. A member of a Marxist-Leninist party or a supporter of one; a Communist.
2. often bolshevik An extreme radical: a literary bolshevik. In all senses also called Bolshevist.

[Russian Bol'shevik, from bol'she, comparative of bol'shoĭ, large; see bel- in Indo-European roots.]

Bol′she·vik′ adj.
Word History: The word Bolshevik derives from the Russian word bol'she, "bigger, more," the comparative form of bol'shoĭ, "big." In Russian, the plural Bol'sheviki was the name given to the majority faction at the Second Congress of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party in 1903. The smaller faction was known as Men'sheviki, from men'she, "less, smaller," the comparative of malyĭ, "little, few." The Bol'sheviki, who sided with Lenin in the split that followed the Congress, subsequently became the Russian Communist Party. In 1952 the word Bol'shevik was dropped as an official term in the Soviet Union, but it had long since passed into other languages, including English.

Bolshevik

(ˈbɒlʃɪvɪk)
n, pl -viks or -viki (-ˈviːkɪ)
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a Russian Communist. Compare Menshevik
2. (Historical Terms) any Communist
3. (often not capital) jocular derogatory any political radical, esp a revolutionary
[C20: from Russian Bol'shevik majority, from bol'shoi great; from the fact that this group formed a majority of the Russian Social Democratic Party in 1903]
ˈBolsheˌvism n
ˈBolshevist adj, n
ˌBolsheˈvistic adj

Bol•she•vik

(ˈboʊl ʃə vɪk, -ˌvik, ˈbɒl-)

n., pl. -viks, -vik•i (-ˌvɪk i, -ˌvi ki)
1.
a. a member of the radical majority wing of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers' Party, 1903–17, advocating abrupt, forceful seizure of power by the proletariat.
b. (after 1918) a member of the Russian Communist Party.
2. a member of any Communist Party.
3. (often l.c.) Older Use: Disparaging. a political radical or revolutionary.
[1915–20; < Russian bol'shevík, derivative of ból'sh(iĭ) larger, greater]
Bol′she•vism (-ˌvɪz əm) n.
Bol′she•vist, n., adj.
Bol`she•vis′tic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bolshevik - emotionally charged terms used to refer to extreme radicals or revolutionariesBolshevik - emotionally charged terms used to refer to extreme radicals or revolutionaries
radical - a person who has radical ideas or opinions
2.Bolshevik - a Russian member of the left-wing majority group that followed Lenin and eventually became the Russian communist partyBolshevik - a Russian member of the left-wing majority group that followed Lenin and eventually became the Russian communist party
commie, communist - a socialist who advocates communism
Adj.1.Bolshevik - of or relating to Bolshevism; "Bolshevik Revolution"
Translations

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃəvɪk]
A. ADJbolchevique
B. Nbolchevique mf

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃɪvɪk]
adj [revolution, party, regime] → bolchevique
n (= person) → Bolchevik mf

Bolshevik

nBolschewik m

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃəvɪk] adj & nbolscevico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
But this is also the story of the Soviet Union's early days, when it seemed highly implausible that a cabal of Bolsheviks would rule the Russian empire for seventy-odd years.
Doctor Zhivago is banned within the USSR until 1988 for its negative portrayal of the Bolsheviks.
Speaking with young Russians at the Seliger youth camp in July 2013, President Putin raised the issue of Russia's role in WWI, and blamed the Bolsheviks for how Russia left the war.
This sort of vision of the country and its relationship with the world can be seen in a movie focused on Nicholas II, the last Russian Tsar who, together with his entire family, was shot by the Bolsheviks.
1918: The last Russian Tsar, Nicholas II, was murdered by the Bolsheviks along with his entire family in the cellar of a house in Ekaterinburg.
Although he identified strongly as an anarchist, Victor Serge (1889-1947) came to side with the Bolsheviks in defense of the October Revolution of 1917 against its enemies and even to defend the regrettable necessity of Bolshevik terror due to the ruthlessness with which the Revolution's enemies were willing to act during the civil war, while still pleading for a synthesis of Bolshevism and anarchism.
All these crucial historical and political developments took place where Bolsheviks toppled the last Czar of Russia, and most importantly it seems that no one at the time had thought of its implication on the Kurdish national question in the years to come.
Kolchak was a hero in the First World War who later led the pro-Tsarist White Army against the Bolsheviks after the 1917 October Revolution.
In the Kremlin, the Bolsheviks rule and starving Muscovites are reduced to eating house cats.
The result, he argues, was that the Bolsheviks seized power in "a socially polarized world" (p.
5) What Trotsky did not recognise in The New Course, and perhaps did not realise himself, was that nothing less than a headlong f light from reality would allow the Bolsheviks to retain this standpoint--insofar as it was defined by their own ideology and utopian aspirations--while also maintaining the policies of the New Economic Policy that kept the Bolshevik regime in power.
Born on March 2, 1919, in a boxcar on the trans-Siberian railway, Toumanova, whose parents were fleeing the Bolsheviks, grew up in Paris, where she studied with the celebrated Olga Preobrajenska.