bombing

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bomb

 (bŏm)
n.
1.
a. An explosive weapon detonated by impact, proximity to an object, a timing mechanism, or other means.
b. An atomic or nuclear bomb. Used with the.
2. Any of various weapons detonated to release destructive material, such as smoke or gas.
3.
a. A container capable of withstanding high internal pressure.
b. A vessel for storing compressed gas.
c. A portable, manually operated container that ejects a spray, foam, or gas under pressure.
4. Football A long forward pass.
5. Geology A lump of lava that has been violently ejected from a volcano and has solidified while in the air.
6. Slang A dismal failure; a fiasco.
7. Slang An old car.
8. Slang One that is excellent or superior. Used with the.
9. Chiefly British Slang
a. A large amount of money.
b. A great success.
v. bombed, bomb·ing, bombs
v.tr.
To attack, damage, or destroy with or as if with bombs.
v.intr.
1. To drop a bomb or bombs.
2. Slang To fail miserably: The play bombed.
3. Slang To paint a graffito.

[French bombe, from Italian bomba, probably from Latin bombus, a booming sound, from Greek bombos, of imitative origin.]

bombing

(ˈbɒmɪŋ)
n
1. a concerted and persistent use of bombs against a target
2. the act of causing a single bomb to explode, esp by a terrorist
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bombing - an attack by dropping bombsbombing - an attack by dropping bombs    
attack, onrush, onset, onslaught - (military) an offensive against an enemy (using weapons); "the attack began at dawn"
bombing run - that part of the flight that begins with the approach to the target; includes target acquisition and ends with the release of the bombs
area bombing, carpet bombing, saturation bombing - an extensive and systematic bombing intended to devastate a large target
2.bombing - the use of bombs for sabotage; a tactic frequently used by terrorists
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
suicide bombing - a terrorist bombing carried out by someone who does not hope to survive it
sabotage - a deliberate act of destruction or disruption in which equipment is damaged
Translations
bombardování
bombning
pommitus
bombardiranje
bombatámadás
爆撃
폭격
bombning
การทิ้งระเบิด
việc ném bom

bombing

[ˈbɒmɪŋ] Nbombardeo m

bombing

[ˈbɒmɪŋ] n
(from air)bombardement m
(by terrorist)attentat m à la bombebombing campaign n (in war)campagne f de bombardementsbombing mission n (in war)mission f de bombardement

bombing

nBombenangriff m (→ of auf +acc); (of target also)Bombardierung f
adj raid, missionBomben-

bombing

[ˈbɒmɪŋ]
1. nbombardamento
2. adj (expedition) → di bombardamento

bombing

اِنْفِجار bombardování bombning Bombardierung βομβαρδισμός bombardeo pommitus bombardement bombardiranje bombardamento 爆撃 폭격 bombardement bombetokt bombardowanie bombardeio бомбежка bombning การทิ้งระเบิด bombalama việc ném bom 轰炸
References in periodicals archive ?
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- Twin suicide bombings in Ankara, killing 102 people on Oct.
Aish Awas, a security expert in Saba Strategic Studies Center said, "The bombing at the police academy is the same as the Al-Sabaeen Square bombing in the sense that both bombings targeted soldiers and cadets who have no relation with terrorism.
Nigerian rebel group Boko Haram has claimed responsibility for the three suicide attacks on churches in Kaduna state on Sunday, saying that the bombings were retribution for past Christian "atrocities" against Muslims.
1 Ayman al-Zawahiri, has a $25million bounty on his head for his role in the 1998 US embassy bombings in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Kenya.
The UN has no police function, but the publicity given the letter in the local media helped cement the idea that others, not the Iranian government, are responsible for stopping such bombings that are imposed from abroad.
The firsthand accounts of the bombings are terrifying, bringing an immediacy to the book's evaluation of the effectiveness and moral justification for bombing civilians.
They present 10 papers that address this sordid history through discussion of the nature of the bombing campaigns of Europe during World War II, the British "humane bombing" of Iraq between the two World Wars, US destruction of Japanese cities and its legacies in American war-making to the present, the justifications given for the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Japanese strategic bombing of the Chinese city of Chongqing, bombing and the morality of war, and the current international legal framework concerning aerial bombardment of civilians.
Grayling is thus taking on the task of carefully examining from a moral perspective the bombing campaign of the RAF against Nazi Germany; his reasoning and conclusions are then applied to the similar campaign of the USAAF XXI Bomber Command, which included the firebombing of Tokyo and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to which Grayling gives much less attention.
Since the early 1980s, the world has witnessed many instances of the grotesque instrument of suicide bombings, spreading death, destruction, and fear.
It happened in the London bombings and also in the Birmingham pub bombings.
In 1997, he allegedly orchestrated a dozen bombings in Cuba intended to deter the growing tourism trade.
The July 7 bombings that killed more than 50 people on London's mass transit network underlined the vulnerability of systems that depend on open access in order to function.