chemical bond

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chemical bond
top: covalent bonding in a water molecule
center: metallic bonding in silver
bottom: ionic bonding in sodium chloride

chemical bond

n.
Any of several forces, especially the ionic bond, covalent bond, and metallic bond, by which atoms or ions are bound in a molecule or crystal.

chemical bond

n
(Chemistry) a mutual attraction between two atoms resulting from a redistribution of their outer electrons. See also covalent bond, electrovalent bond, coordinate bond
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemical bond - an electrical force linking atoms
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
covalent bond - a chemical bond that involves sharing a pair of electrons between atoms in a molecule
cross-link, cross-linkage - a side bond that links two adjacent chains of atoms in a complex molecule
hydrogen bond - a chemical bond consisting of a hydrogen atom between two electronegative atoms (e.g., oxygen or nitrogen) with one side be a covalent bond and the other being an ionic bond
electrostatic bond, electrovalent bond, ionic bond - a chemical bond in which one atom loses an electron to form a positive ion and the other atom gains an electron to form a negative ion
metallic bond - a chemical bond in which electrons are shared over many nuclei and electronic conduction occurs
peptide bond, peptide linkage - the primary linkage of all protein structures; the chemical bond between the carboxyl groups and amino groups that unites a peptide
References in periodicals archive ?
The topics include crystallographic research developments, magnetism in pure and doped manganese clusters, muon colliders and Higgs boson physics, and chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth.
According to the presenters, bentonite bonding theory is based on the behavior of bentonite at low percent solids and high mixing shear rates.
Hirschi's (1969) social bonding theory has become what most criminologists refer to today as the major control theory.