Bonds


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Related to Bonds: Savings Bonds, Treasury bonds, Premium bonds, investment bonds, Government bonds

bond

 (bŏnd)
n.
1. Something, such as a fetter, cord, or band, that binds, ties, or fastens things together.
2. often bonds Confinement in prison; captivity.
3. A uniting force or tie; a link: the familial bond.
4. A binding agreement; a covenant.
5. A duty, promise, or other obligation by which one is bound.
6.
a. A substance or agent that causes two or more objects or parts to cohere.
b. The union or cohesion brought about by such a substance or agent.
7. A chemical bond.
8. A systematically overlapping or alternating arrangement of bricks or stones in a wall, designed to increase strength and stability.
9. A written obligation requiring the payment of a sum at a certain time.
10. A debt security obligating a government or corporation to pay a specified amount on a future date, especially a marketable security that makes semiannual interest payments.
11.
a. A guarantee issued by a surety agency on behalf of a client, requiring the surety to pay a sum of money to a third party in the event the client fails to fulfill certain obligations; a surety bond.
b. A sum pledged as a guarantee.
12. A sum paid as a guarantee of a person's appearance at court for trial; bail: set bond at $100,000; released the prisoner on a $10,000 bond.
13. The condition of being held under the guarantee of a customs bond: imported merchandise stored in bond.
14. An insurance contract that indemnifies an employer for loss resulting from a fraudulent or dishonest act by an employee; a fidelity bond.
15. Bond paper.
v. bond·ed, bond·ing, bonds
v.tr.
1. To join securely, as with glue or cement.
2. To join (two or more individuals) in a relationship, as by shared belief or experience: An interest in banking reform bonded the two political opponents.
3.
a. To finance by issuing bonds: Two projects have already been bonded.
b. To raise by issuing bonds: The city bonded $900,000 for the new park.
4. To gain the release of (someone who has been arrested) by providing a bail bond: bonded his cousin out of jail.
5. To issue a surety bond or a fidelity bond for.
6. To lay (bricks or stones) in an overlapping or alternating pattern.
v.intr.
1. To cohere with a bond.
2. To form a close personal relationship.
3. To secure release from prison by providing a bail bond: The accused bonded out of jail.

[Middle English, variant of band, from Old Norse; see bhendh- in Indo-European roots.]

bond′a·bil′i·ty n.
bond′a·ble adj.
bond′er n.

Bonds

 (bŏndz), Barry Lamar Born 1964.
American baseball player who set a single-season record of 73 home runs with the San Francisco Giants (2001) and whose 756th home run broke Hank Aaron's lifetime record (2007).

Bonds

(bɒndz)
n
(Biography) Barry (Lamar). born 1964, US baseball player: holder of records for most home runs in a season (73) and a career (762)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He had gone over to Klein's, looking up some cotton broker whom he wished to see in regard to securities, exchanges, stocks, bonds, or something of the sort, Madame Ratignolle did not remember what.
During this display of emotions so natural in their situation, Hawkeye, whose vigilant distrust had satisfied itself that the Hurons, who disfigured the heavenly scene, no longer possessed the power to interrupt its harmony, approached David, and liberated him from the bonds he had, until that moment, endured with the most exemplary patience.
I have met with grievous mishaps by sea and land, and have been long held in bonds among the heathen-folk to the southward; and am now brought hither by this Indian to be redeemed out of my captivity.
Tom," said his master, kindly, "I want you to notice that I give this gentleman bonds to forfeit a thousand dollars if you are not on the spot when he wants you; he's going today to look after his other business, and you can have the day to yourself.
The most o' what they've got is in gov'ment bonds, I always heard, and you can't lose money on them.
fortunate for a large circle of friends and acquaint- ances, whose sympathy and affection he has strongly secured by the many sufferings he has endured, by his virtuous traits of character, by his ever-abiding remembrance of those who are in bonds, as being bound with them
This preparation for bonds, and the additional ignominy it inferred, took a little of the excitement out of me.
Isabella and he had had an hour's interview, during which he tried to elicit from her some sentiment of proper horror for Heathcliff's advances: but he could make nothing of her evasive replies, and was obliged to close the examination unsatisfactorily; adding, however, a solemn warning, that if she were so insane as to encourage that worthless suitor, it would dissolve all bonds of relationship between herself and him.
The bonds of horror that held her burst asunder when it was within arm's-length.
I noticed that these bonds were all portions of a gentleman's dress.
Still, as he had been commanded, the captain of those who watched me went in before the king and told him that I lay without in bonds.
I laugh, when those who at the Spear are bold And vent'rous, if that fail them, shrink and fear What yet they know must follow, to endure Exile, or ignominy, or bonds, or pain, The sentence of thir Conquerour: This is now Our doom; which if we can sustain and bear, Our Supream Foe in time may much remit His anger, and perhaps thus farr remov'd Not mind us not offending, satisfi'd With what is punish't; whence these raging fires Will slack'n, if his breath stir not thir flames.