boneyard

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bone·yard

 (bōn′yärd′)
n.
1. A cemetery.
2. A place where the bones of wild animals accumulate.
3. A place where refuse, especially discarded cars, accumulates or is kept.

boneyard

(ˈbəʊnˌjɑːd)
n
an informal name for a cemetery

bone•yard

(ˈboʊnˌyɑrd)

n.
1. a cemetery.
2. a place where the bones of wild animals accumulate.
3. a place where old or discarded cars, etc., are collected before being disposed of.
[1850–55, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
A visit to the Fagen Fighters WWII Museum offers an alternative to boneyards and the destruction of warbirds: restoration.
Buyers and craftspeople for the Custom Hangar climb through aviation boneyards and storage facilities in search of rare artifacts that they refurbish and finish by hand.
Penn State archeologist Pat Shipman recently calculated that the age ranges of mammoths found in these ancient boneyards suggest that the animals were hunted, not just scavenged after a catastrophe killed an entire herd, Discovery News reported.
Frontman Winston McCall's demonic bark added an extra layer of intensity to monsters like Boneyards and Karma, while support band The Ghost Inside came back on stage for a brutal run through Deliver Me.
The atmosphere was electric as the crushing Boneyards, Sleepwalker, Karma and Home Is For The Heartless elicited brutal pits which stretched right back to the mixing desk.
BONEYARDS is a pick for any interested in space opera science fiction, and returns Rusch's character Boss to a new adventure.
Kyle, 21, was bitten in half on Sunday at the Boneyards surf break off Bunker Bay, about 300km south of Perth.
In essence, she became a sort of boneyards artist-in-residence.
Indianapolis, IN, in 1981, had observed, while making the rounds selling filtration products, that more efficient centrifuge separators were often found in company boneyards or resting, unused, in a plant corner.
net, you can play online for free at Cave Dog's Boneyards online community.
By late 1945, some 30 boneyards in California, Arizona, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Georgia, and Texas held an estimated 117,000 aircraft.