boot money


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boot money

n
(Team Sports, other than specified) informal unofficial bonuses in the form of illegal cash payments made by a professional sports club to its players
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the players just get peanuts, a couple of quid boot money that barely covers their petrol or the cash they lose taking time off work.
Campese compared th Eastronomical wages on offer in some areas of the game today to the boot money he and his team-mates used to receive in the amateur era.
Campese compared the astronomical wages on offer in some areas of the game now to the boot money he and his team-mates used to receive in the amateur era.
Rugby did not become fully professional until 1995 by which time the game's authorities believed it was the only way to stop the exodus to rugby league and end the "shamateurism" that saw many players receive boot money payments.
There had always been boot money, of course, but the sport is now an industry and to keep sponsors and attract crowds it needs more than cheap bars and plentiful beer - it needs to entertain and to excite.
Marginson used to be a milkman, reliant on boot money from the likes of Salford City and Bacup Borough.
I asked him, knowing he would only be earning, at best, pounds 10-a-week boot money.
We have an Asda Belgian milk chocolate toffee and fudge egg, a Lidl Favorina big chocolate bunny and a Sainsburys milk chocolate egg with a football boot money bank up for grabs.
Under 10s players also received hand-painted individually designed boot money boxes, painted by Peter Smith of Stoke-on-Trent.
Chances are it was seen back in the distant past when Moseley were plying their trade at The Reddings but even then it is unlikely the hat-trick hero was earning his boot money in the front row.
They might be a collection of office and manual workers, playing for little more than boot money.
When I was at Pontypool we were amateurs, and Ray Prosser ensured that there was never any boot money.