borough

(redirected from Boroughs)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

bor·ough

 (bûr′ō)
n.
1. A self-governing incorporated town in some US states, such as New Jersey.
2. One of the five administrative units of New York City.
3. A civil division of the state of Alaska that is the equivalent of a county in most other US states.
4. Chiefly British
a. A town having a municipal corporation and certain rights, such as self-government.
b. A town that sends a representative to Parliament.
5. A medieval group of fortified houses that formed a town having special privileges and rights.

[Middle English burgh, city, from Old English burg, fortified town; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

borough

(ˈbʌrə)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a town, esp (in Britain) one that forms the constituency of an MP or that was originally incorporated by royal charter. See also burgh
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any of the 32 constituent divisions that together with the City of London make up Greater London
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any of the five constituent divisions of New York City
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the US) a self-governing incorporated municipality
5. (Historical Terms) (in medieval England) a fortified town or village or a fort
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in New Zealand) a small municipality with a governing body
[Old English burg; related to beorgan to shelter, Old Norse borg wall, Gothic baurgs city, Old High German burg fortified castle]

bor•ough

(ˈbɜr oʊ, ˈbʌr oʊ)

n.
1. (in certain U.S. states) an incorporated municipality smaller than a city.
2. one of the five administrative divisions of New York City.
3. (in Great Britain)
a. a self-governing incorporated urban community.
b. a town or constituency represented by a Member of Parliament.
c. a medieval fortified town.
4. (in Alaska) an administrative division similar to a county in other states.
[before 900; Middle English burw(e), bor(u)g town, Old English burg fortified town]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borough - one of the administrative divisions of a large cityborough - one of the administrative divisions of a large city
administrative district, administrative division, territorial division - a district defined for administrative purposes
2.borough - an English town that forms the constituency of a member of parliament
townsfolk, townspeople, town - the people living in a municipality smaller than a city; "the whole town cheered the team"
burgh - a borough in Scotland
pocket borough - a sparsely populated borough in which all or most of the land is owned by a single family
rotten borough - an English parliamentary constituency with few electors

borough

noun district, area, community, quarter, region, sector, ward, parish, neighbourhood, locality, locale the New York City borough of Brooklyn
Translations
بَلْدَةٌ تَتَمَتَّعُ بِحُكْمٍ ذاتي
městosamosprávné město
bykommunekommune
bær eîa borg
miestelissritis
neliela pilsēta/rajonspilsēta/rajons

borough

[ˈbʌrə] Nmunicipio m; (in London, New York) → distrito m

borough

[ˈbʌrə] n
(= town) → municipalité f
(= district) → arrondissement m urbain

borough

n
(also municipal borough)Bezirk m, → Stadtgemeinde f

borough

[ˈbʌrə] ncomune m, circoscrizione f amministrativa; (in London) → distretto

borough

(ˈbarə) , ((American) ˈbə:rəu) noun
in Britain, a town or area with certain rights.
References in classic literature ?
And though, by the lapse of time, and those mutations which age produces in empires, cities, and boroughs, Queen's Crawley was no longer so populous a place as it had been in Queen Bess's time-- nay, was come down to that condition of borough which used to be denominated rotten--yet, as Sir Pitt Crawley would say with perfect justice in his elegant way, "Rotten
Even political principle must have been in danger of relaxation under such circumstances; and the violin, faithful to rotten boroughs, must have been tempted to fraternize in a demoralizing way with a reforming violoncello.
He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world.
Steerforth said) than the lowest boy in the school; that he had been, a good many years ago, a small hop-dealer in the Borough, and had taken to the schooling business after being bankrupt in hops, and making away with Mrs.
Besides a variety of powerful causes not existing here, and which favor in that country the pretensions of rank and wealth, no person is eligible as a representative of a county, unless he possess real estate of the clear value of six hundred pounds sterling per year; nor of a city or borough, unless he possess a like estate of half that annual value.
When Sir Thomas comes, I dare say he will be in for some borough, but there has been nobody to put him in the way of doing anything yet.
EVERYBODY knows, in a general way, that the finest place in the world is -- or, alas, was -- the Dutch borough of Vondervotteimittiss.
Barnabas Shuttleworthy -- one of the wealthiest and most respectable citizens of the borough -- had been missing for several days under circumstances which gave rise to suspicion of foul play.
Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable family, in the usual terms; how it had been first settled in Cheshire; how mentioned in Dugdale, serving the office of high sheriff, representing a borough in three successive parliaments, exertions of loyalty, and dignity of baronet, in the first year of Charles II, with all the Marys and Elizabeths they had married; forming altogether two handsome duodecimo pages, and concluding with the arms and motto:--"Principal seat, Kellynch Hall, in the county of Somerset," and Sir Walter's handwriting again in this finale:--
Many of the old houses, round about, speak very plainly of those days when Kingston was a royal borough, and nobles and courtiers lived there, near their King, and the long road to the palace gates was gay all day with clanking steel and prancing palfreys, and rustling silks and velvets, and fair faces.
Ambrose, you will form no just opinion of the stupidity of mankind until you have sat upon a Borough Council
Van borough was a sound man in every sense of the word;