Bosnia

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Related to Bosniacs: Bosnians

Bos·ni·a

 (bŏz′nē-ə)
1. A region that constitutes the northern part of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was settled by Slavs in the 7th century and became an independent state in the 12th century. Bosnia was controlled after 1463 by Turkey and after 1878 by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which formally annexed Bosnia in 1908. After World War II Bosnia and Herzegovina formed a constituent republic of Yugoslavia.

Bosnia

(ˈbɒznɪə)
n
(Placename) a region of central Bosnia-Herzegovina: belonged to Turkey (1463–1878), to Austria-Hungary (1879–1918), then to Yugoslavia (1918–91)

Bos•ni•a

(ˈbɒz ni ə)

n.
a historic region in S Europe: a former Turkish province; a part of Austria 1879–1918; now part of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Bos′ni•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bosnia - the northern part of Bosnia-Herzegovina
Bosna i Hercegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia - a mountainous republic of south-central Europe; formerly part of the Ottoman Empire and then a part of Yugoslavia; voted for independence in 1992 but the mostly Serbian army of Yugoslavia refused to accept the vote and began ethnic cleansing in order to rid Bosnia of its Croats and Muslims
2.Bosnia - a mountainous republic of south-central EuropeBosnia - a mountainous republic of south-central Europe; formerly part of the Ottoman Empire and then a part of Yugoslavia; voted for independence in 1992 but the mostly Serbian army of Yugoslavia refused to accept the vote and began ethnic cleansing in order to rid Bosnia of its Croats and Muslims
Bosnia - the northern part of Bosnia-Herzegovina
Sarajevo - capital and largest city of Bosnia; scene of the assassination of Francis Ferdinand in 1914 which precipitated World War I
Translations
Босна
Bosna
Bosnien
Bosnia
Bosna
Bosznia
Bosnia
ボスニア
보스니아
Bosnia
Bosna
Bosna
Bosnien
ประเทศบอสเนีย
Bosnia

Bosnia

[ˈbɒznɪə] NBosnia f

Bosnia

[ˈbɒzniə] nBosnie f

Bosnia

nBosnien nt

Bosnia

[ˈbɒznɪə] nBosnia

Bosnia

البوسْنَة Bosna Bosnien Bosnien Βοσνία Bosnia Bosnia Bosnie Bosna Bosnia ボスニア 보스니아 Bosnië Bosnia Bośnia Bósnia Босния Bosnien ประเทศบอสเนีย Bosna Bosnia 波斯尼亚
References in periodicals archive ?
The future is what brings us together," Vusic said, adding that he knew that 50 percent of Bosniacs still did not trust him "because of the fierce campaign and anti-Serb feeling.
And what about Alevis, Armenians, Arameans (Syriacs), Greeks, Jews, Georgians, Arabs, Protestants or Bosniacs living in Turkey as equal citizens?
His insecurity stems from the lack of Bosniac participation in the political process and administration of the Serb Republic, and the lack of memorialization of war crimes committed against the Bosniacs.
Furthermore, the Bosniacs were able to get international appeal for their struggle in a way that has eluded the Syrian opposition for a number of reasons, including the spectre of Iraq, fear of sectarianism, extremist elements within opposition ranks, and lack of cohesion.
These minorities include Serbs - who are ensured 10 seats - along with Bosniacs, Turks, Romans and Egyptians - who are distributed amongst another 10 seats.
Under the constitution, posts in the Bosnian parliament and its three-part presidency are only reserved for the country's three so-called constituent peoples, Bosniacs, Croats and Serbs.
Ceric replies to the question whether "Muslims from Jeddah are closer to the identity of Bosniacs in Sarajevo (11) or Serbs from Banja Luka" in the following way: "Well, you see, how someone who was killing me, who raped my sister can be close to me" (12).
I wanted to implicate the Kosovars, all the ethnic groups--Albanians and Serbs, Bosniacs and Roma, Ashkali, Turks, and the others--in the ensemble of decisions that concerned them or had bearing on the future of Kosovo.
Bosnian Muslims, ethnically identified as Bosniacs, have long been neighbors with ethnic Serbs who are largely Orthodox Christian, predominantly Catholic Croats and other ethnic and religious minorities, such as Sephardic Jews, Albanians, Roma and others.
Bosnia-Herzegovina is two entities - the Serb dominated Republika Srpska and the Federation in which Croats or Bosniacs - Bosnian Muslims - are the majority
Where this lingering bitterness sought targets, they were easy to find: About 40 percent of the Bosnian population are Bosniacs (Muslims), descended from a largely heretic Christian population whose relative openness to Islam allowed it to take root in BiH, (In Serbia and Croatia the Orthodox and Catholic church organizations remained more influential.